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Thread: Are Takedas still worth the price?

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by JKerr View Post
    What sort of custom options did you go for on the Moritaka? I didn't think they would make anything as expensive as that, aside from their damascus.

    Cheers,
    Josh
    It was this one here. It is in a lot of my cooking pics.



    Here is the specs I asked for:

    Style: Chukabocho (Chinese cleaver).
    Size: 22x11cm
    Steel: Aogami Super Steel / Hammer-patterned Kurouchi / Damascus
    Blade: Very thin and light, for vegetable slicing only.
    Octagonal handle
    Please make the edge slightly curved.

    I would also like the blade polished about a third up from the edge before
    going into the hammer pattern.

    Here is a picture of them putting on the hammer pattern.


  2. #32
    I really really wonder how is the grind on that thing

  3. #33
    It's rock solid. I was very impressed. Honestly, I assumed it was not a Moritaka because it was so "together".

  4. #34
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    I have around 10 Chinese cleavers, but had this one made to be my dream cleaver.
    Aogami Super Steel and Damascus, but with the black finish going 2/3 up in homage to the traditional Chinese Cleavers.

  5. #35
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    Takeda 'style over substance'

    Bought a Takeda 240 ish Gyuto after reading many positive reviews, however when it arrived it had the new profile, which is really thick down the edge. Currently it is back in the box; due to it keeps digging in and gripping the chopping board each time I use it.

    It is also extremely high which people do mention, however this should not be overlooked as someone’s personal preference or a style which you can easily adjust too. If this is your first knife or you have not been cooking for long it may suit; however if like me you have been around for a few years it will take some getting use too and disrupt your usual cutting style drastically.

    In all it is a slower knife to use than a traditional shaped “chefs” knife, which does slow production down in a professional kitchen environment. However for the home cook, foodie, hobbyist they are great talking points.

    I think now unfortunately Takeda may be a case of fashion over professional practicality.

  6. #36
    Senior Member turbochef422's Avatar
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    I love using my takeda in a pro kitchen. Not on the line but as a prep monster. And I usually use knives with less hight (masamoto, mizuno,fowler) but find the takeda quite enjoyable and a nice change of pace that can really cut anything.

  7. #37
    Senior Member Brad Gibson's Avatar
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    ill take that thing from you if you dont want it anymore jj
    "A recipe has no soul. You as the cook must bring soul to the recipe." -Thomas Keller

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by sw2geeks View Post
    I have around 10 Chinese cleavers, but had this one made to be my dream cleaver.
    Aogami Super Steel and Damascus, but with the black finish going 2/3 up in homage to the traditional Chinese Cleavers.
    Nice cleaver,most of mine have been barrel handle chinese carbons.A cleaver I use at home is the Suien Virgin Carbon,takes a sharp edge & holds it well,I don't mind a larger blade wt. a little weight.Works well as spatula putting food in the skillet.

  9. #39
    Quote Originally Posted by JJ Lui View Post

    In all it is a slower knife to use than a traditional shaped “chefs” knife, which does slow production down in a professional kitchen environment. However for the home cook, foodie, hobbyist they are great talking points.
    Not many J-knives take the shape of a "traditional chef's knife". The Takeda's I've seen do have some belly, allowing for some rock chopping, but many professionals here prefer a flat profile.

  10. #40
    Senior Member quantumcloud509's Avatar
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    I love using my 240 Takeda old skool in a pro kitchen. Prep and on the line. (Silver spacer one turbochef)
    Amat Victoria Curam Fortune favors the prepared.
    "A human being is primarily a bag for putting food into." -George Orwell

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