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Thread: Hog Butchering. WARNING: Graphic photos.

  1. #1

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Hog Butchering. WARNING: Graphic photos.

    Got to attend a 4 hour seminar on hog butchering today. We did everything but dispatch the hog. Really good class for only $15. tomorrow we will take all of the cuts we butchered and go through a period (mid-19th century) curing process.

    Getting the scalding bath ready


    two minuted per dunk. The bath must be between 140F and 150F to loosen the hairs, but not set them.


    Using bell scrapers to remove the hair. These are actually from the mid-19th century when this process was used. The reason for removing the hair is to preserve the skin which helped with the curing process.


    After a couple of dunks of the front section, the spreader bar is repositioned to the front legs to facilitate dunking the rear portions of the sow.


    About an hour and a half and 6ish dunkings into this, the hair is nearly gone.


    A gorgeous little red barn was just in the next field over, tempting me all day.


    Now the hair is gone, we can eviscerate the hog.


    Now that she's eviscerated, we can behead:


    Video here:



    Then we can split into two sides:


    And because I know many of you are as sick as I am...a slo-mo video of the bone saw going through the spine:



    Now we have two sides on the butchering table, ready to break down into individual cuts:


    And a little kochi pron:

    Yeah, I know...that's not what it's for...but I had yet to use it and thought this would be a great way to christen it. I'll do a forum bird sometime soon.

    After a demo of each cut on the RHS of the pig, I scored a prime position to do the ham on the LHS. Here I am with the instructor talking about the lines of the muscles and how to shape the cuts:



    I had some trouble finding the ball joint, so the instructor got back in there and helped me locate it:


    Then I was able to get in there and pop the tendons holding the joint together. Was cool to see the joint open up when the last tendon was cut. Great feedback.


    This little kochi cuts damn well.


    Making the last cut, tracing along the pelvis to separate the ham.


    A few shots of the cuts as they were coming off, into the holding bin:




    BACOOOOON!


    Classmate taking off the 2nd belly.


    Fat ass rooster, guarding the hen house:


    Fun macro shot of the bone saw at the end of the day:


    The butchering knives supplied by the instructors, made by Green River:


    The full set of photos are here...including some more gory ones that I redacted for this post:

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/843786...7650336631211/

    I'll do another post tomorrow after the curing class....if I get enough photo-worthy opportunities, which isn't a given. Hope you guys and gals enjoy and this wasn't too gory for you. I had an absolute blast and learned a lot.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  2. #2

    ecchef's Avatar
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    That's pretty cool Danny. It's nice to see the old methods are still being practiced. Particularly like the bone saw shot.
    Though I could not caution all I still might warn a few; Don't raise your hand to raise no flag atop no ship of fools. - Robert Hunter

  3. #3
    Senior Member TheDispossessed's Avatar
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    thanks for posting!

  4. #4
    daveb's Avatar
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    Kewl beans Danny. Hope you enjoyed the class as much as I enjoyed the post.
    Dave
    Older and wider.

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    Awesome sir! Thanks for sharing!

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    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    Danny, how much hands on cutting did you do? Next time you come to NC, there will be a test. HA. Nice photos too
    One thing you can give and still keep...is your word.

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    Pretty cool and a bargain at $15. Thanks for sharing.

  8. #8

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mucho Bocho View Post
    Danny, how much hands on cutting did you do? Next time you come to NC, there will be a test. HA. Nice photos too
    Ha! I only got to do that single ham. I would have gladly done the whole hog though.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  9. #9

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    We still butcher our own..Its a family affair..We all gather up,scrap,clean and butcher..My wife works her butt off rendering lard and cooking fresh pork for us over whats left of the scalding fire..I wont hijack your thread but Id like to post a couple pics..My dad in the first one..that knife is not a boning knife..Its an 80+ year old butcher knife that has been sharpened down to the shape of a boning knife Third generation using it now..

    After the split..

    I think its awesome that have a class like that in your area..I think its important for folks to know were their food comes from..It feels really good to butcher your own meat..

  10. #10

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Very cool Kentucky! Thanks for sharing! My family was a bit suburbanized, though I did spend a few years in a children's home where we had a working farm and were expected to participate in the work...everything from gelding, crop picking, slopping hogs, cleaning out the sty, etc. Given my age, duration at the home, and the laws against (unpaid) child labor, it was more of a novelty/character-building thing than anything else. It certainly made an indelible impression though.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

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