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Thread: Masamoto ks vs Takeda as vs Konosuke - replacing a miyabi 240mm sg2

  1. #1

    Masamoto ks vs Takeda as vs Konosuke - replacing a miyabi 240mm sg2

    I have a 240mm miyabi Gyutou with sg2 that I'm going to replace with a higher grade blade. I currently have a great deal on a masamoto ks, but I was curious if anyone thought either of the other brands is better and/or their experience with the miyabi birchwood sg2.

    Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
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    What is it that you don't like about the Miyabi?

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    Welcome to the forums.

    I read your post over on the "other" forum, and the information in it is germane to your question here, so I hope you don't mind that I reproduce it here.

    I recently visited the local Sur La Table to get a new 240mm gyutou or 10 " chefs knife and really fell in love with the Bob Kramer handle on his reproduction chefs knives. I didnt really dig the blade on the Shun however, and upon reading criticism it seems as though it is prone to major chipping, so Im glad that I avoided it. I also saw the Henckles Kramer Carbon, but was turned off by the brass in the handle. I dont know if that should be a a big deal to me, but I dont understand the introduction of a lead based metal in a cooking tool held during the majority of a shift. I ended up getting the Miyabi Birchwood handle 240mm gyutou because it was the size that I truly wanted at a more affordable price.

    After bringing it home and trying it out, I must say that I'm pretty underwhelmed. Out of the box its fairly dull. The display at the store was sharper, obviously due to them putting it to a stone, but it just doesnt seem as though it should be so dull that it cant break tomato skin 4"-6" from the heel.

    Anyway, I have a buddy who has a brand new Masamoto KS 240mm who has buyers remorse on the price, and its a blade that I've always wanted. Can anyone speak to it personally? I have never owned a White #2 blade. How does the metal stand up? Does it hold an edge well/how hard is it to sharpen? I think that I am going to return the Miyabi and snag the Masamoto. I just wanted to make sure it was the right call.

    If anyone else believes there to be a better 240mm gyutou at that price point (200-350) please let me know.
    And the reply you got:

    Factory edges are poor and for the most part always will be. Part of owning a high end knife is putting your edge on it. If you can't sharpen even the KS will disappoint, because you can't unlock the potential. I can and have made a $1 Santoku from Walmart cut better than a friends J knife by refining the geometry and sharpening the edge. IMO until you can sharpen you won't be happy for long.
    I'd have to agree with the response that you got about the necessity of learning how to sharpen any knife you eventually end up with, be it the Miyabi, the Masamoto or any other.

    Now, as to your question. I have a Masamoto KS, and it is an excellent knife, with a very good profile, and the white steel it is made from is very easy to sharpen, but it doesn't have the edge retention of the SG2 steel in the Miyabi. It requires more TLC than the Miyabi, as it is a non-stainless blade. I also wouldn't say it is a "higher grade" blade, and I think the fit and finish of the Miyabi is better than the Masamoto.

    I had a Takeda, and it is also an excellent knife, and because of the AS steel it is made from, it has a bit more edge retention than the Masamoto, but still not as much as the Miyabi. It also requires more TLC.

    Which Konosuke were you looking at? There are several lines, each with their own strengths and weaknesses.

    Let me end with an observation that you said that the Masamoto was "a blade that I've always wanted". I would suggest that you follow your desire and get the Masamoto, for that reason alone. If you don't, it will always be the one that "got away". If you find you don't like it as much as you thought, it will be an easy sell on this forum or another.

    Hope this helped.

    Rick

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    Welcome to the forums.

    I read your post over on the "other" forum, and the information in it is germane to your question here, so I hope you don't mind that I reproduce it here.



    And the reply you got:



    I'd have to agree with the response that you got about the necessity of learning how to sharpen any knife you eventually end up with, be it the Miyabi, the Masamoto or any other.

    Now, as to your question. I have a Masamoto KS, and it is an excellent knife, with a very good profile, and the white steel it is made from is very easy to sharpen, but it doesn't have the edge retention of the SG2 steel in the Miyabi. It requires more TLC than the Miyabi, as it is a non-stainless blade. I also wouldn't say it is a "higher grade" blade, and I think the fit and finish of the Miyabi is better than the Masamoto.

    I had a Takeda, and it is also an excellent knife, and because of the AS steel it is made from, it has a bit more edge retention than the Masamoto, but still not as much as the Miyabi. It also requires more TLC.

    Which Konosuke were you looking at? There are several lines, each with their own strengths and weaknesses.

    Let me end with an observation that you said that the Masamoto was "a blade that I've always wanted". I would suggest that you follow your desire and get the Masamoto, for that reason alone. If you don't, it will always be the one that "got away". If you find you don't like it as much as you thought, it will be an easy sell on this forum or another.

    Hope this helped.

    Rick
    Rick,

    Thanks for the response. Really, it was a continuation question more than anything. Both posters state that I don't know how to sharpen, I do. I just haven't put a new edge on the miyabi because I feared it may be more difficult to return. The potential deal on the masamoto happened to pop up later in the same day I bought my miyabi. Just out of curiosity, do you also own a miyabi? You just seem to hold them in high praise. I do not hate the blade. Perhaps the advertising stating how sharp it should be out of the box by SLT, but not the blade.

    Thanks again

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    Quote Originally Posted by Kumawins View Post
    Rick,

    Thanks for the response. Really, it was a continuation question more than anything. Both posters state that I don't know how to sharpen, I do. I just haven't put a new edge on the miyabi because I feared it may be more difficult to return. The potential deal on the masamoto happened to pop up later in the same day I bought my miyabi. Just out of curiosity, do you also own a miyabi? You just seem to hold them in high praise. I do not hate the blade. Perhaps the advertising stating how sharp it should be out of the box by SLT, but not the blade.

    Thanks again
    I owned a Miyabi at one time, which is why I mentioned the fit and finish, which is very important to some, but not to others. Mine had a decent edge when I bought it. It was a good knife, but just too similar to other knives I had, which is why I no longer have it. (I love SLT's return policies.)

    It's good you know how to sharpen; you'd be surprised how many people don't. I you get the Masamoto, you'll have an enjoyable time with it on the stones.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    I owned a Miyabi at one time, which is why I mentioned the fit and finish, which is very important to some, but not to others. Mine had a decent edge when I bought it. It was a good knife, but just too similar to other knives I had, which is why I no longer have it. (I love SLT's return policies.)

    It's good you know how to sharpen; you'd be surprised how many people don't. I you get the Masamoto, you'll have an enjoyable time with it on the stones.
    Thanks for the response. Just out of curiousity, do you have any experience with the konosuke hd line?

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    The konosuke HD is an excellent line. I would choose an HD over both the masamoto ks or miyabi. Sure more will chime in.

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    welcome!!
    Chewie's the man.

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    Senior Member Duckfat's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    Let me end with an observation that you said that the Masamoto was "a blade that I've always wanted". I would suggest that you follow your desire and get the Masamoto, for that reason alone. If you don't, it will always be the one that "got away". If you find you don't like it as much as you thought, it will be an easy sell on this forum or another.

    Rick
    Well said Rick and I agree. If the Masamoto is the knife you really want then that's the one you should get. The Masamoto is nothing short of awesome. That would be an easy choice for me over the Kono but then so would a Sakai from BluewayJapan.

    Dave

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