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Suj/Yanagii Recommendation plz - Page 2
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Thread: Suj/Yanagii Recommendation plz

  1. #11
    Senior Member Seth's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by JasonD View Post
    Depends what you plan to use this on. Suji is going to be much much easier to pick up and use immediately.
    But also in the sense that using a good yanigiba sort of requires its own space; like, it's time to cut now. Suji and gyuto seem more functional to me and so you grab it a cut something immediately.

    I have a 220 shig slicer, 240 misono, 240 inox, 270, 300 blue yanigiba - so addressing size, I have to say that the 270 gets more use and is more immediate. The 300 (kengata style) comes out more on special occasions and feels a little big to me.

    If you have good pricing down under on suisin you know you will generally get excellent f&f. I also like the challenge of sharpening a single bevel, so if you are fascinated by cutting edges and traditions, I would go 270 yani. Besides, we all know you will get all of these blades eventually.
    Everywhere you go, there you are.

  2. #12
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    Quote Originally Posted by Seth View Post
    ...Besides, we all know you will get all of these blades eventually.
    LOL Ain't that the truth!
    Francesco
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  3. #13
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    Is it worth trying to slice thick steak after searing/cooking with a yanagiba? My German 8" slicer -- some day very soon soon to be be replaced by a 150-180 petty or funi -- is very sharp but I find it doesn't make a very good slice of rare or medium-rare steak or roast. The way the yanagi lasered throught the loin raw has me convinced it will do a pretty good job, and at 1½" it shouldn't steer. What do you think?
    Francesco
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  4. #14
    Senior Member Seth's Avatar
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    I believe most steering comes from improper use. Single bevel knives are for the most part for one-sided cutting and work best for this though, with some pride, I can say that my bigger, thinner usuba can crosscut a carrot, center cut, with no crackling. I think for protein slicing of any type, one-sided, the technique is to use high shear/down-pressure ratio and this will not steer. (Gee...I guess that's why these knives tend toward the long side.)
    Everywhere you go, there you are.

  5. #15
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    I think much of it is cultural.Japanese use single bevel for all kinds of cuts.Westerners are used to 50/50 blades.I like the yanagi for seared meats,steak,pork & chicken.Because they have such a wide shinoge line it is a one sided affair.

    They are specialized knives unsuited for certain types of cutting.I was used to double bevels even slicing sashimi.When I got my first quality yanagi about 10 yrs. ago there was no turning back.Wt. Sashimi & sushi topping when you learn how to control the blade you can make all kinds of cuts.Perfect teared lines of Sashimi.Thick or paper thin sushi topping.

    There is a learning curve for sharpening,however once you learn it SB are fun to sharpen.,your fingerpads fit perfect in the hollow grind,only one bevel to sharpen & take off the burr on the stone as well easy peasy japanesy

    Now that I seem to becoming an old fart,ah make accellerating into a senior citizen.I am more right biased I even turned my assem.white steel gyuto into a single bevel

  6. #16
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    Quote Originally Posted by SameGuy View Post
    Is it worth trying to slice thick steak after searing/cooking with a yanagiba? My German 8" slicer -- some day very soon soon to be be replaced by a 150-180 petty or funi -- is very sharp but I find it doesn't make a very good slice of rare or medium-rare steak or roast. The way the yanagi lasered throught the loin raw has me convinced it will do a pretty good job, and at 1½" it shouldn't steer. What do you think?
    Note To Self: a 300 mm yanagiba works exceptionally well for this purpose. My education continues.
    Francesco
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  7. #17
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    Thanks for all the advice guys!! Keep them coming!

  8. #18

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    I bought both to be honest with you.

    Somehow cutting roasts or raw meat doesnt fit my feeling of what yanagiba should be doing.

    So I have a slicer for slicing all the red stuff, and yanagi to cut fish.

    Plus as Seth mentioned, slicer is more versatile somehow.
    Yeah, faster to pick up and just cut something without too much fuss.

  9. #19
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    Sugi's are slicers,for a person not using & sharpening all the time,It will do the job & they are versatile.I went through 2 Masa carbon sugi's at work over the yrs.They worked great till I wore them down,the tips got so thin it's hard to sharpen without wearing thin the skin on your fingerpads.

    But like I said for for home use that's not even a factor.For a more all around slicer the Suji maybe a good choice.But if you ever feel like expanding your horizon holding a yanagi in your hand is a diff. experience.

  10. #20
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    I'll prolly get both haha at some point in time but I'm swinging more towards a Suji right now, just cause I have absolutely 0 experience sharpening a single bevel.

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