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Thread: Best choice for professional Butcher

  1. #1
    Von blewitt's Avatar
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    Best choice for professional Butcher

    I'm looking for advice from someone with a butchery background.

    A good friend of mine is a butcher, he knows I'm into high end kitchen knives, and he asked my advice about upgrading his kit. At the moment he uses a mix of victorinox rosewoods, and swibo's. Is there a higher end brand out there? Are there custom makers who specialise in butchery knives? any advice would be appreciated.

    Thanks in advance
    Huw

    Make simplicity seem like abundance - Tetsuya Wakuda

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    Senior Member F-Flash's Avatar
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    I have heard lot of good things about munetoshi butcher. Haven't used it myself, but I bet, for the price, it's can't miss swing.

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    R Murphy carbon series

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    I'm in the process of putting together a set of higher end butchering knives. Some that I have are a Butch Harner bullnose butcher, a Marko scimitar, and boning knives from Butch, Marko and Silverthorn and one on order from Haburn. Another knife on order is one for pig sticking from Hiko Ito, a knife maker from Hawaii. I've seen others from Houston Edge Works and .

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    Almost hate to say it sine you are liquidating your Burkes, but at the highest end of things he would be a great maker. He has a couple years of butchery under his belt from his younger days.

    Another great option -- and definitely less expensive -- is Butch Harner. Butch has been making a lot of breaking knives, etc. the last couple of years. And he may even still have a boit of stainless, if that is your friend's preference.
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    David (WildBoar's Kitchen)

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    Senior Member spoiledbroth's Avatar
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    One thing to consider... He should be able to steel it if he's doing real volume.
    "The self-seeking man who is looking after his personal comforts and leading a lazy life- there is no room for him even in hell" - Narendranath Dutta

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    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    What about the butcher knives that Jon introduced recently? No bling, but look very purposefully designed and from SLD (not sure I remember correctly) steel.

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    Senior Member
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    Quote Originally Posted by spoiledbroth View Post
    One thing to consider... He should be able to steel it if he's doing real volume.
    Well that is a bit of a conflict. That will mess up the edges of a harder steel knife. So you would want to use something softer, which will then need to be treated more frequently... Why a steel vs a stone, or at worst a ceramic rod?
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    Quote Originally Posted by Matus View Post
    What about the butcher knives that Jon introduced recently? No bling, but look very purposefully designed and from SLD (not sure I remember correctly) steel.
    I think they're SKD-12, actually (Essentially A2 steel, which is often used in the decent Western woodworking chisels; ~5% Chromium, rather than the 11-13% spec'd in SLD. Notably tougher than D2/SLD, but less wear resistance.), but I may be mistaken as well.

    Depending upon how much money your friend wants to spend, Von Blewitt, I have found both the Swedish Frost and EKA butchery knives to be a step up from the usual Victorinox, F-Dick, etc before getting into Japanese or customs. They're NSF certified, use pretty well treated Sandvik 12C27 steel (Which takes and holds a much better edge than Victorinox, or the common German brands I used to use before really getting into knives.), have comfortable non-slip handles, and aren't terribly expensive. I just sharpened one of my Frosts last night, and I actually really like this steel for a mass-produced knife; it's the baby brother to the 13C26/AEB-L that a number of Japanese smiths use, and AEB-L is also the darling of the custom knife scene. Super fine grained, and sharpens kind of like a low-alloyed carbon; it takes a really aggressive edge that can still shave hair, even at low grits, and without a lot of work or even sophisticated sharpening tools. It would respond well to a honing rod, or steel... If he's worried about his knives getting damaged or going walkabout, these two brands are ones I would definitely consider in his shoes.

    There are others on this forum with far more 'high-brow' butchery knife experience than I (My best is a Hiromoto SLD Honesuki, which I really like.), if this is what your friend seeks, and I am sure they will continue to comment.

    - Steampunk

  10. #10
    Senior Member Matus's Avatar
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    Thumb up for my Hiromoto honesuki as well I do plan to re-handle it though

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