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Preventing rust during storage or in the shop
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Thread: Preventing rust during storage or in the shop

  1. #1

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    Preventing rust during storage or in the shop

    How does everyone deals with their carbon steel knives if their shop and/or kitchen are extremely humid? When I'm making a non-stainless blade and I turn my back for a few seconds, I'll turn back around and it'll be orange (slight exaggeration, but still, it feels that way). I've had a couple knives develop a patch of orange dust or a mark here and there that requires a re-finish. That's a pain when the handle's already on.

    The least-intrusive method I've found for managing it is Renaissance Wax, but that's not foolproof nor extremely durable.

    I've heard of people lacquering the blade (clear, I'm assuming) once it's done and shipping it that way with the instruction to use acetone or lacquer thinner to remove it before use. Does anyone actually do that here?

    I'm also curious what that pretty rainbow stuff was on one of Jon@JIK's newer shipment of knives.

    I should really just get a de-humidifier for the shop, but I don't want to waste the energy if there's a less heavy-handed solution waiting.

  2. #2
    You could also cover the blade in a dowel that is soaked in mineral oil and tape it up whilst doing handle work.

  3. #3
    Some of our blades are shipped from Japan with lacquer coating... and they do look mysteriously rainbow. We wanted to have this particular coating that Japanese people use, but it's highly flammable and so we couldn't bring it back with us or ship it.

  4. #4

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    I'm assuming the rainbow lacquer isn't the same stuff one can buy at an auto parts supplier in a spray can. Too bad.

    Do you know anything about the particulars of that lacquer coating? It is beautiful.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Keith Neal's Avatar
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    This stuff works very well, even in Florida. It isn't cheap, but it is good.

    http://www.corrosionx.com/
    If you reach the age of 60 without becoming a curmudgeon, you haven't been paying attention.

  6. #6
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    I guess not the humidity is such a problem, but rather temperature changes causing condensation when temperature raises. Could you maintain a 18 degree centigrade temperature at night, and especially during the early morning?

  7. #7

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    I've never noticed any condensation on anything in the shop.

    But doesn't atmosphere condense when the temperature goes down, like going from afternoon heat to night cool? I was a wildfire fighter for a time and this type of phenomenon was of concern because it effected how flammable the dirt and low growth was, and also effected wind patterns near bodies of water (well, not the condensation part, but the temp change part). Yes, dirt burns when the humidity is 2% for weeks on end...even after a night of making dew out of whatever mosture might be in the air.

    Lemme see...warm air holds more water than cool...dew forms when temperature of solid object less than dew point of air...dew forms all night...something about infrared radiation...brain hurts a little.

  8. #8
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    I was wrong: if air temperature falls during night, humidity in air will condensate. Still a reason to get temperature as stable as possible

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by BurkeCutlery View Post
    You could also cover the blade in a dowel that is soaked in mineral oil and tape it up whilst doing handle work.
    Mineral oil.

    Cheap, effective, easy to apply, readily available, and food safe.

  10. #10
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    SpikeC's Avatar
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    Butt a dowel is not going to cover much of the blade!
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
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