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Thread: 16 pound pork shoulder

  1. #1
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    16 pound pork shoulder

    I just picked up a 16 pound boneless pork shoulder. I havent smoked a piece of meat this big. how long should I cook it? what temp? I'm using a big green egg. I know I could look this up online, but I thought it would be more fun to post it here. pics when the spice rub is on.

  2. #2
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    I have no idea, but I will be happy to try any leftovers on Sunday

    Stefan

  3. #3
    Are you sure it's not two boneless pork shoulders? I've never seen a 16 pound boneless pork shoulder. 16 pounds BONE IN? Yes. Boneless? No. That would have been quite a humongous pig!

    If it really is 16 pounds, I figure you're in for at least 10 - 12 hours, depending on the thickness of the shoulder at its thickest point. Boneless pork shoulders are hard to gauge because they're cut up and the thickness varies; a thinner part may be done while a thicker part may need a lot more time. I recommend tying it up and then just check it with a thermometer or use a remote thermometer, preferably with two sensors in two distinct locations, i.e. one in a thick portion and another in a thinner portion, to monitor how it's cooking. (I personally hate cooking boneless pork shoulders.)

    I like mine to get up to about 185-190, wrap it in foil, and let the residual heat finish the cooking. I save all the melted fat and juice, strain the fat out with a gravy separator, and mix the juice with sauce (if you use it) and baste the meat with this after it's been pulled or chopped or however you want to serve it.

    Good luck!
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

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    Well, it's actually 15.54 lbs so I rounded up. It really is boneless! and it's actually the smallest one I could get at Costco. I would have gotten bone in if it were available. It may very well be two shoulders but I haven't taken it out of the vacuum pack to inspect it yet. If it's one piece I will cut it in two in order to speed cooking. I was thinking it might take about 15 hours at 225'F.

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    That's definitely 2 butts in one cryo...

  6. #6
    Well I always say 2 butts are better than one when its that much weight.

    But seriously, its done when its done. You can estimate it all you want, when that pig part stalls at 180 there is nothing you can do but light another cigar and refill your sweet tea glass. 195-205 is the endpoint but I let the probe tell me its time to pull.

  7. #7
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    A sixteen pound shoulder sounds beyond reedickulous... Especially if it's the smallest one you could find at Costco... Regardless- you should brine the sucker first. Weigh your protein, weigh your brining fluid, combine em'- use that total as your 100%, and do a 2% salt ratio, 1% sugar(more or less depending on your tastes), and and about 10-15 grams of spices to every kilogram of weight depending on the strength of the spice. If it actually is 16 pounds it's gonna take about 7-9 days to brine(unless you inject it, but that's a whole other story- which is worth telling cuz it reduces the brining by about a third...). If you do smoke it- I'd suggest staying under 200 hundred degrees, and putting a pan of water somewhere close to the heat source(I'm not familiar with the eggs so I don't know if this is feasible), the water will help regulate the ambient humidity in the smoker and curtail the 'stall'- which is when you're aiming for an internal temp and you come right to the edge of it but it takes many hours to actually reach those last few degrees. This is primarily due to the fact that the out side layers of protein have dried, and formed a shield that doesn't allow the heat to properly circulate via the natural juices in the protein. It essentially acts as a heat shield. But the higher humidity defers this effect to an appreciable degree. All it takes is a pan of water A nice dry rub compliments the brine rather well, and if you increase the heat towards the end of the smoke you'll get a nice crust/bark.

  8. #8
    rule of thumb I've used. 1 hr/lb @ ~200-225

  9. #9
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    Well, it definately is two butts in a cryopak. Which makes my life a little easier I don't think I have enough time to brine this sucker but I'll plan to next time. I've heard about a pan of water or apple juice and a foil tent to curb the stall. I'm definetly going to have some left overs considering I'm cooking 15.54 lbs for about three people. Thanks for all the advice so far. I'm off to make the rub!

  10. #10
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Jim View Post
    Well I always say 2 butts are better than one when its that much weight.

    But seriously, its done when its done. You can estimate it all you want, when that pig part stalls at 180 there is nothing you can do but light another cigar and refill your sweet tea glass. 195-205 is the endpoint but I let the probe tell me its time to pull.
    Finished before I saw your post Jim, hope it didn't come across as sounding dismissive.

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