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Thread: ODC (Old Dirty Carbon)

  1. #231
    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    I have a Utica cleaver. It's fugly, but gets pretty sharp.
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

  2. #232
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    If it is made from 1095 as a lot of American carbons as I've been told, you should be fine.

  3. #233
    Here's a couple I have on hand:



    I have no idea what the 14" bullnose is, and I'm rather scared someone used it as a fireplace poker at some time in its life. The little one is Ontario Knife.

    I have a couple other really old ones in storage from my great grandfather (same place these came from)...I'll have to dig them out!

  4. #234
    Senior Member hobbitling's Avatar
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    Looks like a sword for a tiny pirate, or a large butcher knife for breaking down big cuts of meat or even whole carcasses. If you had one of those and a cleaver you could probably butcher just about anything.

  5. #235
    Quote Originally Posted by hobbitling View Post
    Looks like a sword for a tiny pirate, or a large butcher knife for breaking down big cuts of meat or even whole carcasses. If you had one of those and a cleaver you could probably butcher just about anything.
    I know right??

    Its actually very thin though, 2mm at the handle, tapering to 1.5mm right before the upsweep in the spine...where there's a false clip on the other side. Its a weird knife lol, almost like a machete. One of the others I have is similar in length, but is a narrower blade, without the bullnose tip. It's just a long, curved taper to a point. Similar thickness though.

  6. #236
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Very cool knives, guys! I say the Utica DESERVES some new shoes.

    Cris, the 14" scimitar/breaking knife was likely intended for professional use. The breaking portion would most likely hit about 2.5mm at the spine, while the thin overall blade shows it's age, in my mind. The 70s seemed to produce fatties, but older blades were thin, largely because it worked. I'd love for Son to add his perspective on these.
    09/06

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  7. #237
    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    Very cool knives, guys! I say the Utica DESERVES some new shoes.

    Cris, the 14" scimitar/breaking knife was likely intended for professional use. The breaking portion would most likely hit about 2.5mm at the spine, while the thin overall blade shows it's age, in my mind. The 70s seemed to produce fatties, but older blades were thin, largely because it worked. I'd love for Son to add his perspective on these.
    Well, my family have been ranchers back six generations lol...it could be very, very old. It's entirely possible my great grandfather used it for butchering cattle, before we'd started sending that stuff out to be done. I know its been sharpened rather carelessly with some kind of angle grinder, which would be very unlike my great grandfather, my grandfather, or my dad for that matter. They were/are all very deliberate and meticulous. Out in the field though, necessity is the mother of invention lol...so I guess anything could have happened.

  8. #238
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    In other times people looked differently to knives than we, knife nuts, do. And they didn't have the material we do have. A perfectly common way of sharpening in Europe was using a coarse SiC stone with a lot of pressure, and deburring with a coarse steel. Or a piece of wood with fine sand.
    Finer natural stones were used for razors only.

  9. #239
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    That is gorgeous any special technique?

  10. #240
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by gic View Post
    That is gorgeous any special technique?
    no illusions, just stropping, making edge trailing strokes. I expect a lot of cuts in this world have been made with what we would call a wire edge.

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