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Fun with Larousse Gastronimique
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  1. #1

    knyfeknerd's Avatar
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    Fun with Larousse Gastronimique

    L.G. is my absolute favorite cookbook/guide of all time. If you don't own at least one, you probably should. I always try to snatch up the older versions/printings when I'm at a used bookstore, and usually end up gifting them to my chef friends. The older versions include preperations for rat, donkey, dog and some other various and strange creatures.
    Anyway, a while back I was in the habit of randomly scanning through Larousse and preparing whichever dish my finger landed on, but haven't tried in a long time. Time to get back on the horse(not horsemeat, but I'm assurred it's tasty) and continue this fun. I'll begin to catalog, photograph and do reviews. Might be at least a week before I get started, but will definitely share.
    I challenge some of you to do the same. Would be cool if Steeley dug up some random Larousse pics and facts too.
    Do you love Larousse Gastronimique too?
    If "Its" and "Buts" was candy and nuts, we'd all have a Merry Christmas
    -Cleon "Slammin'" Salmon

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    I do, and it's prob my fav too. And if you can actually 'randomly scan through Larousse and prepare whichever dish my finger landed on, but haven't tried in a long time' then you must have been cooking with it for a few decades. Wow!

    "The older versions include preperations for rat, donkey, dog and some other various and strange creatures."

    I didn't know this. I've just got the 2001 version.

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    knyfeknerd's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cutty Sharp View Post
    I do, and it's prob my fav too. And if you can actually 'randomly scan through Larousse and prepare whichever dish my finger landed on, but haven't tried in a long time' then you must have been cooking with it for a few decades.
    A couple decades, but let me add that I'll try to cook anything within reason! Some Larousse entries are outrageous, and I'm not going to be cooking my dog up anytime soon.......................unless the Zombie Apocalypse happens.
    If "Its" and "Buts" was candy and nuts, we'd all have a Merry Christmas
    -Cleon "Slammin'" Salmon

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    Senior Member Namaxy's Avatar
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    I love the book Knyfe. I have an original 1961 first English edition, and the 2001 Boxed edition. I'll join you in the random page game, and try to post pics here!

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    JohnnyChance's Avatar
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    I just got a copy for my birthday, haven't gotten too deep into it yet, just some browsing here and there.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

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    Senior Member Duckfat's Avatar
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    Every one really interested in cooking should have a Larousse. Not really a cook book but an awesome volume of information. There's always some thing more to learn.

    Dave

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    knyfeknerd's Avatar
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    Supremes de Volaille Ambassadeur

    Tonight I had a couple chix breasts to use for dinner, so I adapted this recipe from Larousse using the ingredients I had at hand. Keep in mind that a lot of the things in this dish are things my wife will not eat. Things like mushrooms and truffles which I happen to love.
    So, a supreme should be an "airline" breast seared in butter. It should be atop some croutons fried in butter and surrounded by mushrooms and truffles, and lightly topped with supreme sauce(chix veloute).It is also traditionally served with buttered asparagus.
    I used tomatos and onions instead of truffles and mushrooms and a boneless breast instead of an airline. I also subbed english peas for asparagus.
    [IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG]

    It was pretty good. Super-rich. It tasted "old school" and I feel as though it took at least a couple of years off of my life-and I scaled back the butter content significantly!
    My wife loved it and she is happy, isn't that all that really matters???
    If "Its" and "Buts" was candy and nuts, we'd all have a Merry Christmas
    -Cleon "Slammin'" Salmon

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    Looks good, but why such concern over butter? Your wife won't eat mushrooms? Good heavens!

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    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    that looks great!

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    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    Larousse Gastronomique was first printed in 1938
    [IMG][/IMG]

    During the First World War (1914 – 1918) Chef Prosper Montagné organises the central kitchens of the French army and also sets up the famous ‘Ecole des Cuistots’ (Cooks School). With endless enthusiasm he takes it upon himself to take his teachings and thoughts to the four corners of the country and to lecture to very enthusiastic audiences.

    Then in 1920, on the corner of Faubourg Saint-Honoré and the Rue de l'Echelle, Chef Montagne, he opens an establishment whose signage carries its new title, simply: ‘Montagné, delicatessen’. It is immediately a hit and in his crisp, white chef’s jacket, the master officiates in front of his customers and prepares the most exquisite dishes for them. But despite its seeming success, the business world was not in his veins and probably due to poor management it is forced to close. He leaves it as poor as when he started it.

    He retires to Sevres, to again pick up the pen and publishes ‘La Grande Livre de Cuisine’ in 1929 which he collaborates on with Pierre Salles. It is a clearly a titanic task; where this well read man with his vast professional knowledge continues to share on each page his unquestionably wealth of all things gastronomic.

    Prosper Montagné, in his last years, was called in as a quality technical adviser by Mr. André, the director/owner of the Restaurant de la Reine Pédauque. Where he was again able to work in front of the customers as it had formerly done in his own establishment.

    The Chevalier de la Légion d'Honneur of the Legion of Honour; Chef Prosper Montagné passed away in Sevres, France on April 22nd, 1948 at the age of 83. Carrying with him forever the high regard of his peers and the thoughts of his many pupils, apprentices and friends.
    Amongst his written culinary works are:

    1900 - 'La Grande Cuisine Illustrée’ (The Great Kitchen Illustrated) with Prosper Salles; his first venture into culinary written work
    1913 – ‘la Cuisine Fine’ (The Fine Kitchen)
    1929 - ‘La Festin Occitan’
    1929 – ‘Grand Livre de la Cuisine’ (The ‘Large Book of the Kitchen’)
    1941 - ‘Cuisine avec et sans ticket’

    Footnote
    The ‘Larousse Gastronomique’ has gone through many editions and revisions in its time. Something I am in two minds about:
    On one hand it is great to have a book that is updated and includes modern information on ingredients etc On the other hand should a classic like this be altered?

    Montagne’s Larousse Gastronomique, published in 1938 with a preface by Escoffier and gold flames licking embossed spit-roasting chickens on its dark-green cover.

    Inside, its simple A-to-Z format contains the entire world of French cuisine, including six pages on butter. Even a cursory read makes one thing obvious: Little that appears on trendy 21st-century menus, from cardoons to beef cheeks.
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

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