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  1. #11
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    First English translation 1961 .

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    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  2. #12
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    Chef Prosper Montagne.
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    there is a elite dining club named for him.

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    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  3. #13
    Senior Member Keith Neal's Avatar
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    When you go to Larousse Gastronomique on Amazon, it has the usual "click to look inside" offer, but in this case virtually the entire book is there. You can read or look up something easily.
    If you reach the age of 60 without becoming a curmudgeon, you haven't been paying attention.

  4. #14
    Senior Member DwarvenChef's Avatar
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    I culinary school I dragged that book around just for giggles. Chef would do the random "stab" and that was the supprise menu item. Sometimes it even came out as intended I also have the 2001 ed.

  5. #15

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    Oiseaux sans Tete

    -Literally translates to "Bird without a head". Though I have no idea why it's named this, maybe it does kind of resemble a dead headless bird when it comes out of the oven.
    This is small filets of beef or veal pounded thin, stuffed with some type of stuffing(usually breadcrumbs soaked in milk with bacon) rolled up and tied with butcher's twine. This is then cooked in the oven with a little beef stock. It is traditionally served with mashed potatoes and a sauce made from the reserved cooking liquid/stock thickened with roux.
    Today I found a couple petite sirloins on the cheap for my meat. I made my stuffing with bacon, onion, garlic, a little celery and just a sprinkle of panko to soak up the excess bacon grease. Tonight I did white rice instead of potatoes(time saver) and some julienned carrots for some veg.
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    The meal was pretty good. The flavor of the stuffing really permeates the rest of the dish. However, the beef "rolls" or "headless birds" really look like dog turds before they are sliced. How do you say "dog log" in french ???
    If "Its" and "Buts" was candy and nuts, we'd all have a Merry Christmas
    -Cleon "Slammin'" Salmon

  6. #16

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    Good choice! Jeez, my mum would cook like this all the time.

    Did a little research: It's also known as 'L’oiseau sans tête' (which makes more sense as oiseou is singular, and oiseux plural for 'birds') and one good way of putting it is that the dish is no more a headless bird than a hot dog is a heated hound, although the name still succeeds in scaring children. It's actually considered a Belgian dish (no wonder my family likes similar stuff) and the French name traces back French Belgium and to Flemish and farther back to Dutch and a butcher from Amsterdam, and relates to an old dish called Blinde Vink or 'blind finch' possibly because of some similarity in appearance to roasted birds (they kept birds in those days that were blinded to prevent them from being distracted from singing). The dish can also be made with beef, lamb, veal or chicken, apparently, and you're supposed to have it with beer (the same used in cooking) or red wine.

    Apparently, these days you don't actually cook it yourself; you buy it ready to cook from the butcher.

  7. #17
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    CUTTY nice post I eat this stuff up .

    No seriously can i get a bite.
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  8. #18
    Senior Member DwarvenChef's Avatar
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    I was doing some random thought ideas and I'm looking for a way to make it work. Random # generater and a quartering bit so I can get a random page and a page quarter to pick random recipe

  9. #19

    knyfeknerd's Avatar
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    Ballottine Time
    These are a couple ballottines I did recently. Not very traditional, but still delicious. Both are chicken. And yes, the Pepin video is the way to go.[[IMG][/IMG]
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    This one is stuffed with quinoa pilaf. That's my 300mm Tojiro yanagi with Mike Henry turd handle.[IMG][/IMG][IMG][/IMG]
    This one is stuffed with sausage, ricotta and some herbs. That's my 300mm Yoshihiro Tako.
    I'm probably going to do another one this week. Any requests for the stufffing?
    If "Its" and "Buts" was candy and nuts, we'd all have a Merry Christmas
    -Cleon "Slammin'" Salmon

  10. #20

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    Nice knife, the food and bread look great, but maybe just not the plastic plates!

    Quote Originally Posted by steeley View Post
    CUTTY nice post I eat this stuff up.
    Thanks, Steeley. Yes, I've noticed your great historical photos so I'm not surprised! Me, I'm always interested to hear about food history. Larousse or the Oxford Companion to Food are brilliant for this stuff. In fact, I was surprised the OCTF wasn't also mentioned before - Larousse still very French and the Oxford Companion eccentric and British. Alan Davidson's a former British diplomat and was Ambassador to Tunisia, and so I'm chuffed to say I used to play soccer beside and have visited his former house.

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