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Thread: Can anything be done for the back side of this Yanagiba?

  1. #1

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    Can anything be done for the back side of this Yanagiba?

    I was wondering if anything can be done for the "flat" side of this Yanagiba? Here is the picture of it currently:

    [IMG][/IMG]


  2. #2
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    daveb's Avatar
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    Someone run it through a double bevel grinder?

    Older and wider..

  3. #3
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    You can carefully use a conical whetstone to fix that up.
    https://www.japanwoodworker.com/prod...7070231a000040

  4. #4

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    probably though i doubt anyone would admit to it

  5. #5
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    Involves Germans. Lots of Germans.
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    Is that an extremely broadened urasuki or actually a bevel on the edges? Hard to tell because it looks like 2) but the mostly intact kanji suggests 1)?
    "All right. So whatdya do with it?" - "Whatdya mean 'Whatdya do with it?" - "Self defense? Mayhem? Shish kebab?"

  6. #6
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    I think a proper burial is best

  7. #7
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    Can someone describe what the problem here actually is?
    As in history/what happened..?

  8. #8
    Dave Martell's Avatar
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    Looks like someone went to town with a coarse or medium grit stone. I've done a few repairs to knives in this condition, some even came out good too.

    What needs to be done is re-hollowing. The back side is hollow ground on a wheel running perpendicular to the grinder by the knife being ground diagonally. This creates a shallow hollow grind from using a smaller wheel than might otherwise be required. I myself don't have a 3ft wheel in my shop so I mimic that through the use of a rubber sanding block, one that has a curved back side, mounted to a platen on my belt grinder. This works surprisingly well but it's a gamble of skill & luck to get it right without blowing it out in a nasty way. I would think that sandpaper mounted to the block and done by hand, while taking longer, might be a safer bet.


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