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Thread: A knife for terrines

  1. #1
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    A knife for terrines

    I'm starting a new job, and I'll be on the cold starter section. Terrines, galantines and ballontines galore. I figure its an excuse to get a new knife, as I only really have gyutos and a CCK. I was thinking maybe a 210 petty/suji could be good, but I dunno if I want something longer/shorter. More than anything, the cuts need to be straight. When I was on my trial, the guy on the section now was getting ridden something horrid for his wonky cuts, lol. Anyone have an input for me?

    Carbon is fine, budget is variable, hopefully under 300$. I'm a leftie too, so I do struggle getting straight cuts with a bias blade.

  2. #2
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    I'd go serrated. Not at all cool I know, but something Super Slicer esque would work for me.

  3. #3
    I've never seen anyone use a serrated on terrines. I'd think it would mess up the cut/aesthetics? I don't know though

    A 210 petty is a little too short for the job IMO and most tend to be really thin - which makes 'em cut great but also gives it more flex making it harder for a straight cut. I find it easier it get quick, consistent straight cuts with larger blades anyways - & not too much pressure, which will mess up the look.

    If there's room on your station I'd get a 270mm suji. Maxim has a nice looking Itinomonn 270mm now but it might be a little over your budget.

    For sheer budget consideration, I'd get a Victorinox 12in slicer. It's what I've seen used on terrines on most cold stations.

  4. #4
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    Would having a 270 suji be that different from a 270 gyuto? Wouldn't a serrated steer me in the cut, being a lefty? And a quick one on technique.. Should I be using one long push or pull draw, rather than a sawing motion? My first thought on the serrated was that it would mark the produce..

  5. #5
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    I have no idea about the foods you're cutting, but when I cut meat and wider vegetables; serrated knives leave striations and sawing leaves back-and-forth striations with any knife.
    In my opinion you will want a non-serrated blade which will let you make the cut in one stroke. A wider knife will give you more friction and pulling on the sides, which can damage your product and slow you down. I am temped to recommend a 270 left handed fuguhiki. I think you could overcome any steering with some practice. A yanagi would be even more prone to steering I imagine. If you want to keep it more mainstream, then a 270 suji would do well too, although it wouldn't be as fine tuned to the type of slices you will be making, imo.

  6. #6
    A sawing motion (or heavy pressure/with a dull blade) is exactly what you don't want to do. Cutting terrines is all about having a clean, even cut, so you can see the layers/ingredients. You don't want to smash it or saw it.

    Think like how you'd cut sashimi - you want to start towards the heel of the knife and in one motion, slice through towards the tip. Not using too much pressure but instead letting the knife do the work.

    Another carbon option would be the Misono Swedish series. If you don't mind the reactivity or dragon.. Thin but not as much flex as the laser sujis

  7. #7
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    I'd try a 270 or 300 suji. It's not as tall as a gyuto so there should be less resistance when you're cutting. Misono Swedish would be within your budget. I'd probably go for a Carbonext suji actually if I were you, they're great value and I believe you can get lefty versions for not much more
    "There are 2 mistakes one can make along the road to truth...not going all the way and not starting"

  8. #8
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    I like my masamoto ks for terrines the profile is great.

  9. #9
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    Terrines-You need a sharp thin knife.If made in a rectangle mold,I like a 270mm slicer.A damp towel on the board to wipe the blade.I have even put boiling water in a tall metal container to dip the knife.

    On the cheap you can get a Forschner ham slicer 12",A good reasonable blade is the Fujiwara FKH(carbon)270mm Suji.You can get higher end carbon sugi main thing it is thin.Thin carbons razor sharp =good terrine knives.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by jai View Post
    I like my masamoto ks for terrines the profile is great.
    Same thing I was thinking. Long blade, thin behind the edge but not very tall with a nice heft to it, like JDA said start at the back of the product at the heel and with light pressure pull and drop through it in one motion.

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