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Because of you, I sold my Shun. Now help me! :)
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Thread: Because of you, I sold my Shun. Now help me! :)

  1. #1

    Cool Because of you, I sold my Shun. Now help me! :)

    I bought an 8 inch Shun Premier on a great deal... ($100) While determining if I should buy it, I got hooked on the look and feel...

    Then I came on here and researched (whoops!)... Saw how lowly Shun was thought of, so it's on it's way back to the retailer..

    Now, I'm the kind of guy that really likes to jump in with both feet... And I'm ready to start replace my Henckle's Twin Select knife block.
    I've signed up for chopping lessons as well as sharpening lessons, and am thinking of purchasing a knife from my local store, 'knifewear.com', but am open to any other suggestions. I live in Canada though, so shipping + taxes can come into play from US stores...

    I've been looking through the gamut. Takeda has entered my sphere of attention based on positive reviews, as well as the Mr. Itou's at JCK. And then the Konosuke - Sakura is especially appealing.
    But each has their downsides
    I've seen some people speak negatively of Takeda's quality control recently - curved blades, bad handles.
    Mr. Itou has western handles (I think I want wa's).
    And one of the big J-knife retailers has just stopped carrying Konosuke for some unknown reason...

    Are there any current 'must buys' in the $300-$700 range?
    Is it foolish to get a Takeda when my budget is up to around $700?


    What type of knife(s) do you think you want? Japanese 240mm Gyuto for general home kitchen use - with something 'unique' about them - eg: Damascus blade or a rustic look

    Why is it being purchased? What, if anything, are you replacing? I have impulse control issues and I really, really want a *great* Japanese knife. I used to think Henckle's were excellent and spent $1000 on a Henckle's Twin Select (metal handled) knife set. This will replace my current Henckle's chef knife (and I guess technically, my 8 inch Shun Premier that I got rid of )

    What do you like and dislike about these qualities of your knives already?
    Aesthetics- Nice and unique looking
    Edge Quality/Retention- It's okay - only have to sharpen once a year
    Ease of Use- easy enough
    Comfort- comfortable enough, don't use 'em for long

    What grip do you use? I'm adaptable, but will be taking a chopping class from a shop that specializes in J-knives

    Where do you store them? - Currently a knife block, open to suggestions - thinking of a bamboo covered magnet.

    Have you ever oiled a handle? - If I need to, I will...

    What kind of cutting board(s) do you use? Poly cutting boards, but will probably pick a nice larchwood cutting board up

    For edge maintenance, do you use a strop, honing rod, pull through/other, or nothing? Honing rod currently for my henckles, stones for my knew j-knife after I take my class

    Have they ever been sharpened? Yes

    What is your budget? ~$700 give or take

    What do you cook and how often? The knife will be used almost daily. Veggies and meats, no deboning, not much for sushi. General 'kitchen knife'

    Special requests(Country of origin/type of wood/etc)? Japanese 'style' and unique.. EG: pitted blade, damascus, etc.

    Really, I'm looking to be told what to buy, and from any of the big retailers or my local shop...
    Thanks in advancefor any suggestions!

  2. #2

    knyfeknerd's Avatar
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    Welcome Raven, you're in good hands here. For 700$ you can get a few great knives, or a great knife and a good sharpening setup.
    No matter how high the throne,
    there sits but an ass.

  3. #3
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    Yeah $700 is plenty of money for 2-3 really excellent (but more common) knives, or 1-2 and a very good sharpening setup.

    For something a little different, you could check out the Yoshikane kuro uchi damascus knives at JNS or maybe the Tanaka R2 ironwood knives. There's nothing wrong with Takeda, if that's what you're looking for (though I guess there were some reports of quality control issues. I know he has a much better reputation than Moritaka for QC). If "rustic" is your thing then you could also check out Murray Carter or Zakuri knives. There's also a Shig in the BST section that would be excellent, and is certainly pretty rare. Or the Butch Harner 240mm in the BST section. Also super rare and looks to be ground crazy thin.

    There's tons of really cool stuff out there!

  4. #4

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    So you'd like a wa-handled gyuto that looks distinctive, and edge retention is secondary. A few more questions....

    - Do you know if you'd like to stick with stainless steel all the way through, or are you up for going carbon, or would stainless clad carbon be the best balance for you?
    - Do you care if the distinctive looks are done by hand or does that not matter? (some damascus patterning is done by hand, some isn't)
    - What kind of distinctive look appeals to you most - damascus patterning, hammered look, kurouchi blackened look, or funky wood for the handle?
    - Do you specifically want a Japanese maker or is American also under consideration?
    Len

  5. #5

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    Quote Originally Posted by echerub View Post
    - Do you specifically want a Japanese maker or is American also under consideration?
    Or a Canadian, Len!!

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by JasonD View Post
    JasonD
    Yeah $700 is plenty of money for 2-3 really excellent (but more common) knives, or 1-2 and a very good sharpening setup.

    For something a little different, you could check out the Yoshikane kuro uchi damascus knives at JNS or maybe the Tanaka R2 ironwood knives. There's nothing wrong with Takeda, if that's what you're looking for (though I guess there were some reports of quality control issues. I know he has a much better reputation than Moritaka for QC). If "rustic" is your thing then you could also check out Murray Carter or Zakuri knives. There's also a Shig in the BST section that would be excellent, and is certainly pretty rare. Or the Butch Harner 240mm in the BST section. Also super rare and looks to be ground crazy thin.
    JasonD:
    Thanks! I do quite like the look of the Yoshikane kuro uchi damascus, but haven't heard anyone really talk about it? It's been added to my list though.
    I thought people tend to prefer the takeda over the tanaka? The Tanaka does look better to me though..

    I'll check the BST section.. I tend to usually scare away from bst because I don't have the skills to determine if the knife has been abused or has any serious flaws, and hope that a new one wouldn't have that issue.
    That being said, I should check it out...

    Quote Originally Posted by echerub View Post
    So you'd like a wa-handled gyuto that looks distinctive, and edge retention is secondary. A few more questions....

    - Do you know if you'd like to stick with stainless steel all the way through, or are you up for going carbon, or would stainless clad carbon be the best balance for you?
    - Do you care if the distinctive looks are done by hand or does that not matter? (some damascus patterning is done by hand, some isn't)
    - What kind of distinctive look appeals to you most - damascus patterning, hammered look, kurouchi blackened look, or funky wood for the handle?
    - Do you specifically want a Japanese maker or is American also under consideration?
    Echerub:
    Heh, I'm pretty easy going.... distinctive looks can be done by hand, I'm good with any of the metals - as long as they're quality.
    Handle wood is the least important.... I'm definitely more about the blade. I tend to like damascus patterning and a hammered look.
    I'd take a kurouchi blackened look if it was an absolutely unbelievable knife. However, if there was damascus or hammered of near equal quality, I'd prefer the damascus/hammered....
    American is fine as long as the style is Japanese...

  7. #7

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    Quote Originally Posted by RavenFire View Post
    Handle wood is the least important.... I'm definitely more about the blade. I tend to like damascus patterning and a hammered look.
    Absolutely. Handles come and go, and people mess with them too much. It's all about the blade.

    Quote Originally Posted by RavenFire View Post
    American is under consideration as long as the style is Japanese...
    Okay, well, Carter is Canadian anyway

  8. #8
    Hobbyist Craftsman Hattorichop's Avatar
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    If you live in Calgary you should stop in at Knifewear and check out some of the Masakage products, you won't be disappointed. Handling and using different knifes will give you a better idea of what it is that you are looking for. I have a bunch of knives that the guys are recommending and they are all good options (Carter,Tanaka,Masakage and Takeda) but what it really comes down to is what feels the best to you.

    If you like rustic you should check out the Masakage Kato San Koishi gyuto, I have the 240 and it is one of my favorites.

  9. #9
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    I'll check the BST section.. I tend to usually scare away from bst because I don't have the skills to determine if the knife has been abused or has any serious flaws, and hope that a new one wouldn't have that issue.
    That being said, I should check it out...

    Hi Raven, welcome to the forum

    I think you'll find that the B/S/T listings on this forum to be very informative in regards to overall condition and history of the knife. As well as the fact that there is wealth of knife aficionados here who know how to properly care for and sharpen a knife, which translates typically to a very well cared for knife. And you have the added bonus of having a solid line of communication with the seller. If I was you, I'd bide my time for a bit, watch the B/S/T for a bit, and I bet something will pop up that looks desirable. Jon at Japanese Knife Imports is excellent to work with as well, very knowledgable and won't try and sell you on something just for the sake of grabbing some cash.

    Just my two cents. Good luck on your search!

  10. #10
    Senior Member Johnny.B.Good's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forum Raven.

    Check out the knife and gear galleries: http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/fo...Gear-Galleries

    I would advise you to take your time before deciding to spend too lavishly on your first great knife, as your likes/dislikes will probably evolve after a little time on the forum (mine certainly did).

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