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Thread: Erasing the patina

  1. #31
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    In Canada, we're limited (I can't find Flitz ANYWHERE!!!). For my cleanups, I use wet/dry, but for the pitting, would nevrdull, BKF, or Autosol work? If so, which is best?

    Awesome thread!
    09/06

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  2. #32
    This thread is giving me some idea of the next consolidated shipment I'll have sent from the US, so long as customs doesn't determine some things to be hazardous chemicals!

  3. #33
    Senior Member

    SpikeC's Avatar
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    Has anyone else tried baking soda?
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  4. #34
    Home Hardware has Flitz.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    In Canada, we're limited (I can't find Flitz ANYWHERE!!!). For my cleanups, I use wet/dry, but for the pitting, would nevrdull, BKF, or Autosol work? If so, which is best?

    Awesome thread!

  5. #35
    Quote Originally Posted by SpikeC View Post
    Has anyone else tried baking soda?
    I have. Arm & Hammer. Didn't really do a thing.

  6. #36
    If your blade has a factory finish that runs from spine to edge--Sab, Henckels, Wusthof, many Konosukes, Devin Thomas (non-damascus), TKC, many many others--you can restore that finish perfectly with a scotchbrite belt on a belt grinder. This will remove all patina that isn't actual pitting, and is the way many knifemakers finish their blades.

    If the finish on your knife runs from heel to tip, this won't work. In that case, wet/dry sandpaper on a hard rubber block will work. I've used worn 220, lubed with water/Dawn, to restore the finish on several Shigs and Watanabes to better than factory--in my opinion, at least. Pic below shows a Shigefusa 240 kasumi gyuto that developed some corrosion while out for rehandling:



    And this is how it looked after a minute with 220 (sorry about the lighting--fluorescents in second photo):



    For polish, I really like Mother's Mag. Mentioning it because I didn't see it in this thread.

  7. #37

  8. #38
    yes, I'm sorry but I don't know how to spell this Japanese white powder thing for polishing up steel.

  9. #39
    Senior Member shankster's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sara@JKI View Post
    yes, I'm sorry but I don't know how to spell this Japanese white powder thing for polishing up steel.
    Not sure if this is what you mean..you can see it at about 4 minutes

    http://marthastewart.com/914242/nobu...ing-techniques

  10. #40
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    クレンザ is cleanser I believe, which would be an abrasive cleaner like Comet, Barkeepers Friend, etc.

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