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Thread: Get Ready for some old school, as promised

  1. #11
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    Dijon Vinaigrette

    1/4 cup white-wine vinegar
    2 tablespoons finely chopped shallot
    1/2 teaspoon salt
    1/2 teaspoon Dijon mustard
    1/4 teaspoon black pepper
    3/4 cup olive oil

    Whisk together vinegar, shallot, salt, mustard, and pepper until salt is dissolved. Add oil in a slow stream, whisking until emulsified.


    Smoked Paprika Aioli



    8 plump garlic cloves, pureed
    Coarse sea salt
    1 teaspoon smoked paprika
    3 large egg yolks, at room temperature
    1 cup extra-virgin olive oil (lightly flavored not too strong)
    2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice, plus more to taste
    1/2 cup vegetable oil

    In a mortar, pound the garlic cloves with 1 teaspoon of sea salt until a thick paste forms. Scrape the mixture into a stainless steel bowl, stir in the egg yolks and let stand for 5 minutes.
    Set the bowl on a damp kitchen towel (to hold the bowl steady) and begin whisking in the olive oil a few drops at a time. Slowly add 1/2 cup of the olive oil, whisking constantly; as the aioli begins to thicken, you can add the oil in a thin stream. When the aioli is very thick, add 2 teaspoons of the lemon juice. Gradually whisk in another 1/4 cup of the olive oil, then 2 more teaspoons of the lemon juice. Whisk in the remaining 1/4 cup of olive oil, add the 2 remaining teaspoons of lemon juice, then whisk in the vegetable oil. When all of the vegetable oil has been incorporated, season the aioli with lemon juice, smoked paprika and sea salt to taste.


    Fried Blue Gill Recipe

    12 Blue Gill fillet or snapper fillets (patted dry)
    1 cup buttermilk
    1 cup chickpea flours
    1 cup flour
    s&p
    Peanut oil

    soak the fillets in buttermilk with lots of black pepper and a little salt for 30 minutes. remove and dredge in well seasoned 50/50 chickpea flour and ap flour mix. fry in batches in peanut oil or canola until crispy and drain on paper towels. serve with a crisp tart apple cider.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  2. #12
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    This thread is great, I love these stories to accompany the knives. Thanks for taking the time to share with us.

  3. #13

    ecchef's Avatar
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    Son,

    There's a before & after on a Pelouze Sab about halfway down this page: http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...-s-stuff/page3

    Dave did an amazing job on this re-handle. Like yours, this thing has an awsome distal taper; paper thin at the tip with just a bit of flex. I only wish it was a little harder steel.

    Love you posts!
    Though I could not caution all I still might warn a few; Don't raise your hand to raise no flag atop no ship of fools. - Robert Hunter

  4. #14
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    yeah, I remember seeing that post and thought what a wonderful job he did. I thought about rehandling for just about a second and decided that I like them the way they are. I am going to see if I can find anyone interested in refurbing them, but these will stay with me. I won't give them away yet. I want to have some sayas made, but I will need to figure out how to grind smooth half that flared choil so that the saya can slide pass to put a pin in it. Round the spine, straighten the blades, fill in the gaps, retip, sharpen and refinish the sides. lots of work before I can use them again. No tools, no money and no work area makes this all a *****.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  5. #15

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    I believe that last knife might have started life as a 6 inch or so utility.

    Both in Paris at culinary school, and here in Baltimore, the French chefs had painstakingly worn their utility/chef/paring knives into that shape...I watched an ornery old French chef almost start to cry when a cook had ignorantly picked up his more-than-fillet-knife-slender 9 inch former chef knife, and snapped half of it off in a pineapple...

    Though the most popular knife to do this to was a 4 inch Nogent, forming a prized and perfect garnish knife for turning mushrooms and other veggies!

    Great knives you have there, BTW!!!!

    -Michael

  6. #16

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Cool knives, and amazing set of stories...thanks for sharing. Looking forward to "after" photos.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  7. #17
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    The la Trompette M'edille d'or expon unllie 1878 is a fine knife thanks Son
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chefget View Post
    I believe that last knife might have started life as a 6 inch or so utility.

    Both in Paris at culinary school, and here in Baltimore, the French chefs had painstakingly worn their utility/chef/paring knives into that shape...I watched an ornery old French chef almost start to cry when a cook had ignorantly picked up his more-than-fillet-knife-slender 9 inch former chef knife, and snapped half of it off in a pineapple...

    Though the most popular knife to do this to was a 4 inch Nogent, forming a prized and perfect garnish knife for turning mushrooms and other veggies!

    Great knives you have there, BTW!!!!

    -Michael
    there is a very real possibility of that. I know a lot of old chefs and almost all of them have almost exactly that knife. No one touches it, because it's a very personal thing. there is a lot of history there. I should never have said that the knife was essentially useless, I meant for today's chefs they just don't have the experience or tradition to understand this simple little beat up knife.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  9. #19
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    Chef's Lobster Bisque

    Ingredients for 4 to 6 persons :

    1 big lobster tail (around 14 oz] /
    4oz butter
    1 large onion fine dice
    1 large carrot fine dice
    2 celery stalks fine diced
    1 cup dry white wine
    ¼ cup cognac
    2 tbl chopped fresh parsley
    1 tbl chopped fresh thyme
    2 bay leaves (fresh is better)
    1 Tbl tomato paste
    2 ripe tomatoes seeded diced and peeled or 14 oz can low sodium peeled and diced tomatoes
    1 liter [2.11 pints / 34 fl oz]fish stock
    2 Tbl cornstarch
    ½ cup sour cream
    oregano for garnish
    sweet paprika for garnish
    salt & pepper.

    - Prepare the vegetables : peel and dice the onion, carrot, and celery. Peel, seed and dice the tomatoes,
    - Cut the lobster shell with scissors and take the flesh out ; cube it and
    reserve it in the fridge. Roast the shells in a 425 degree oven for 20-30 minutes until red and toasty.
    - Heat the butter in a casserole, add the onion, carrot and celery ; cook for
    20 minutes on gentle flame, vegetables must soften but not get brown.
    - (Heat and) flame the cognac and pour it on the vegetables ; add the white
    wine and the lobster shells. Boil this mixture until it has reduce to half volume.

    - Add the parsley, the thyme, the bay leaves, the tomatoes and paste
    then the fish stock.
    Simmer for 45 minutes and mix very often.

    - Take the shells out and blend the remaining ingredients in a mixer in order to get a very thin soup.

    - Pour the soup into a clean saucepan. Mix the cornstarch with the cream and
    whisk it into the soup. Turn up to a medium flame for another 5 minutes.
    Add the lobster meat and adjust seasoning. Gently simmer for 10 minutes.
    Blend again, top with chopped fresh oregano leaves and sprinkle with sweet paprika.

    - You can choose to leave the lobster meat unblended so that you will
    really taste the lobster ; but real bisque blends it smooth.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  10. #20
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    there is a very real possibility of that. I know a lot of old chefs and almost all of them have almost exactly that knife. No one touches it, because it's a very personal thing. there is a lot of history there. I should never have said that the knife was essentially useless, I meant for today's chefs they just don't have the experience or tradition to understand this simple little beat up knife.
    It can perform very well as long as you don't work on a board. As a boning knife, parer or slicer. My butcher will use his Victorinox till 1/8" is left.

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