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Thread: Cut Brooklin on NPR

  1. #11
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    mr drinky's Avatar
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    I also think the PR comes mostly from location. Brooklyn is a budding foodie center and has all the requisite cogs of the food industry to 'plug into' and that provides a solid base of interest and buyers. There are top-notch butchers, restaurants, markets all nearby and food bloggers and food writers stroll past his slick storefront all the time. If Rader (or anyone here) wanted to pay to open a storefront in Brooklyn, I bet he would eventually be getting a fair amount of press. With that said, I think Joel's tells his story well and that also helps a lot. He doesn't get all knife geeky, he genuinely seems passionate about what he does, and that writer-turned-knifemaker is just too hard for the press to pass up

    k.
    "In Japan they don't call it Japanese food, they just call it food." -- Children's Hospital Quote

  2. #12
    Senior Member Mucho Bocho's Avatar
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    Or: DEVON THOMAS, Mike Davis, Hassinger, Fowler, B. Harner, B. Burke, and my all-time personal favorite Marko Tsourkan. Will Catcheside is beloved too but he's not American. that was the thought going through my head. I think Kaleb and Johnny make good points.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by BurkeCutlery View Post
    O1 is a fine tool steel. His knives are not bad. Lots of people dig the handles, I'd say it's probably worth $600, especially if you are into supporting the Handmade-in-Brooklyn thing.

    But I mean, why has nobody interviewed Michael Rader(whose work impresses every single person I've ever shown it to) for the past 2 years while the same two guys get several magazines, countless blogs, web-video promos, a few tv shows, radio interviews, etc etc? KnowwhatImean? Is there some hidden force at work here?

    I don't think anything negative about it, I just think it's odd how life works. Stuff just happens to people, seemingly at random. I would really like for the world to make sense, but the rain falls on the righteous and the wicked, as a wise man said.
    Can’t say anything about the quality of Cut Brooklyn or Michael Rader knives, since I haven’t handled either—and I’m a bit of a knife newcomer, which is why I joined KKF. Regarding the quality of the knives, I’ll leave it to those of you with more knowledge and experience as pro-chefs and knife makers.

    I do think that from a marketing standpoint, Cut Brooklyn stands a cut above some other makers.

    Firstly, Cut Brooklyn’s website is smart and very nicely designed, the company is very keyed into using social media to create ‘buzz,’ over a thousand tweets since its inception. Websites, tweets, are often the first exposure to new products when looking to purchase a new knife.

    ‘Cut’ also does have an advantage, in that most of the media companies are located in NYC, his shop is in the up-and-coming Gowanus neighbourhood of Brooklyn, very hip. Producing a good product is only part of the challenge, the other is creating enough buzz to expand your audience. Most chefs here in NYC pay attention to publications like NY magazine, and NY Times, since that’s where restaurants are reviewed—so it makes sense that a high-end knife maker would court those [and similar] media outlets for exposure. Also, it's important to note the demographics of any publications/media when seeking press coverage, as these are not inexpensive knives.

    And, yes, the word ‘Brooklyn’ is trendy, and gets traction, website hits, etc.

  4. #14
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    We're ignoring the fact that media outlets often get guests that have been used before in other places.

  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by Larrin View Post
    We're ignoring the fact that media outlets often get guests that have been used before in other places.
    You’re certainly right about that.

    Who gets coverage is often resulting from idea pitches between editors and writers based on their knowledge and suggestions by their contacts, balanced with what the publication feels will pull the most viewers/readers. If someone’s already been covered, they’ve already gained a certain amount of name recognition which is counts for something. Media likes ‘buzz,’ that can be in the form of ‘something new,’ ‘something that’s been around,’ or ‘something timely’—whatever the pitch is, it’s usually pitched as something people will want to read about.

    I do think it’s good that media picks up on knives and their makers. Articles in food mags/media have definitely peaked my interest in quality knives. An article in Saveur years ago on Keijiro Doi in particular, rocked my boat [got me wanted to buy knives!]. I agree with you that it would be preferable if a wider range of makers got covered, but good to see it’s at least getting out there.

    Apologies if I’m off topic!

  6. #16
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    I have written this before. An article in New York Times can be arranged through an agent (first hand information) and I suppose, an agent can arrange an interview at WYNC or NPR. It is not free, and in case of NYT, it actually costs a lot of money.


    There is also a shift toward organic foods, healthy eating,home cooking etc, so anything that falls under that umbrella (knives indirectly do), could be of interest to the media. There was a program on WNYC about spices a while back.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post
    I have written this before. An article in New York Times can be arranged through an agent (first hand information) and I suppose, an agent can arrange an interview at WYNC or NPR. It is not free, and in case of NYT, it actually costs a lot of money.


    There is also a shift toward organic foods, healthy eating,home cooking etc, so anything that falls under that umbrella (knives indirectly do), could be of interest to the media. There was a program on WNYC about spices a while back.

    M
    Marko,
    Would like to read what you’ve written on NYT, is it on this site?

    An agent promising a piece in NYT can fall into that problematic gray area of editorial ethics—they can pitch stories, they can't guarantee what ends up in print. I’m not implying that knife makers need or should get agents/publicists/social media consultants [a good way to waste money]—but I am saying that small businesses could be more savvy, if their intention is to expand their audience beyond the customers they already have. A good reputation, great product, word of mouth, is all important—good branding, an innovative look at business certainly can’t hurt.

    Yes, there has been an editorial trend towards organic, craftsmen, things like basement charcuterie, etc. The whole localvore trend is everywhere, so if chefs want local ingredients wouldn’t they also respond to local knife makers in the same way? What's not to like from an editorial standpoint, knives are: cool, traditional, hand-made, distinctive, contemporary, utilitarian, art.

  8. #18
    Senior Member tgraypots's Avatar
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    I'm curious.....who has the Cut Brooklyn pass around now?
    Tom Gray, Seagrove, NC

  9. #19
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
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    There was one or two write ups in NYT about Cut Brooklyn.

    Using an agent to pitch articles is nothing new, that is how agent and paper make money. I am surprised that this practice is relatively unknown.

    Some of articles are pretty superficial and often shallow, indicating lack of knowledge or interest on behalf of people writing them. That is a good indicator about a pitched article.

    What I actually mean, was that I have written about agent/paper connection before on the forum. I can find out exact numbers (dollars and cents) how much it costs to get an article published in a paper like NYT.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  10. #20
    Senior Member Namaxy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DitmasPork View Post

    An agent promising a piece in NYT can fall into that problematic gray area of editorial ethics—they can pitch stories, they can't guarantee what ends up in print.
    This is simply not true in my experience. In a business completely unrelated to anything discussed here I wrote, word for word, an 'article' that was read on WBUR (Boston), and subsequently printed in a Boston newspaper. My only rite of passage was a publicist and $$.

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