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Thread: The Chemistry of the Barbecue Stall

  1. #11
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    And here, brothers and sisters, is incontrovertable proof that THERE IS NO BARBEQUE NORTH OF PHILIDELPHIA!!!!

    Hax the Cook CLEAVERS RULE!!!
    A barbeque believer will not profane pork by boiling, liquid-smoking, submeging in sous-vide, or affirm with those who do.

  2. #12
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    Actually, I prefer dry wood on a slow fire and a half-pan of water in the smoker box with the meat.

    Hax the Cook CLEAVERS RULE!!!
    A barbeque believer will not profane pork by boiling, liquid-smoking, submeging in sous-vide, or affirm with those who do.

  3. #13
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by hax9215 View Post
    Actually, I prefer dry wood on a slow fire and a half-pan of water in the smoker box with the meat.

    Hax the Cook CLEAVERS RULE!!!
    I wasn't singling you(or any one else) out with that blasphemous quote Hax btw... I just don't follow the religious zeal that some people have when a comes to certain cooking techniques. There's a multitude of different methods out there, and I'd like to try the majority of them before I'm in the ground. I prefer to have an open mind and a full stomach

  4. #14
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    I hope I did not offend, Brainsausage. One must examine different scriptures in their search for the truth, and as heresy goes your statement was relatively menial. I wish you a good journey towards the light.

    Hax the Cook CLEAVERS RULE!!!
    A barbeque believer will not profane pork by boiling, liquid-smoking, submeging in sous-vide, or affirm with those who do.

  5. #15
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    IME using soaked wood for smoking just wastes your charcoal, and adds an element of chaos to temperature control. proper attention to venting should be able to control the amount of O2 getting to your smoking wood, and thus force a smolder instead of a burn...and if you have good equipment, you can even control the rate of the smolder
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    I have some problems with the interpretation of the graph. The wet bulb temperature shows humidity increasing until about 1 1/2 hours into the cook time, and then it declines at a steady rate. The author says that the stall is caused by evaporative cooling while the surface of the meat dries. If that's the case, the humidity levels should reflect the stall--if the meat came out of the stall due to its surface drying and the roast generating less moisture, the wet bulb thermometer should decrease at a faster rate once the roast is dry.

    There seems to be some hinky science behind this. I'd like to see a lot more information on their test set up before I'd say this is valid.
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  7. #17
    Senior Member lowercasebill's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucretia View Post
    I have some problems with the interpretation of the graph. The wet bulb temperature shows humidity increasing until about 1 1/2 hours into the cook time, and then it declines at a steady rate. The author says that the stall is caused by evaporative cooling while the surface of the meat dries. If that's the case, the humidity levels should reflect the stall--if the meat came out of the stall due to its surface drying and the roast generating less moisture, the wet bulb thermometer should decrease at a faster rate once the roast is dry.

    There seems to be some hinky science behind this. I'd like to see a lot more information on their test set up before I'd say this is valid.
    well put..
    phase change will absorb energy with out changing temperature.. think water to ice and the reverse it cannot be discounted ,, basic physics.
    also .. get a big green egg and forget the water pan. if you are competeing wrap it for time control.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Carl's Avatar
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    I'm another BBQer. I don't know Hax, but I know the type. I'm much more Dr. Jekyll than Mr. Hyde when it comes to BBQ, and the end result is all that matters. In Hax language, if I have to sell my Dover sole to the Devil to get good BBQ... well, my choice is made.

    I have an electric water smoker, a pellet offset smoker and a bullet charcoal smoker. I've smoked with water and without, chips, chunks, shreds, pellets, briquettes, wet, dry. While my water smoker cooks in half the time of the dry methods, bar none the best barbecue I make is last weeks barbecue. I don't mean the BBQ I made on Aug 28th. I mean whenever I make more Q than I need I freeze it in vacuum bags and simmer it in water on the stove to bring it back to life. It's always, and I mean always, better out of the bag. Let's be honest, it's impressively good out of the box, but it's always better out of the bag.

    This is not sous vide in the purest sense, but it's about as close as I can get without expensive equipment, and it's all I need, a big burner, a big stock pot, and a big vacuum bag full of meat.

    I've seen this type of demonstration before. Another demo can be done in a pressure cooker. It's hard to get smoke but super easy to get fall apart tender in the pressure cooker, and there is no stall in there.

    Like it or not, smoke for 4-6 hours at a very low temp (as low as 180) and then sous vide it at your desired final temp, add sauce, mop or braising liquid in the bag to take it over the edge. If you want a bark, bring it in 5 degrees low and grill or broil to the end. There's not a lot of romance, but when you're talking about consistency and super high quality, what works works.
    BBQ Heretic

  9. #19
    Senior Member Carl's Avatar
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    I forgot to mention my question.

    How much steam pressure was generated in the vacuum bag? It matters.
    BBQ Heretic

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucretia View Post
    I have some problems with the interpretation of the graph. The wet bulb temperature shows humidity increasing until about 1 1/2 hours into the cook time, and then it declines at a steady rate. The author says that the stall is caused by evaporative cooling while the surface of the meat dries. If that's the case, the humidity levels should reflect the stall--if the meat came out of the stall due to its surface drying and the roast generating less moisture, the wet bulb thermometer should decrease at a faster rate once the roast is dry.

    There seems to be some hinky science behind this. I'd like to see a lot more information on their test set up before I'd say this is valid.
    This is my issue with the article, the assumptions of whats going on are not supported. The results I have no trouble accepting. There is a lot going on in a BBQ- combinations of woods, water content of the fuel, water bath or not, super low volume smokers like the BGE or a stick burner that goes through a 1/4 cord of wood. They all experience a stall when cooking larger cuts of meat. Whats that mean? Hell if I know.

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