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Thread: Pork shoulder steaks braised in root beer and porter

  1. #11
    The alleles created by mutation may be beneficial


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    Quote Originally Posted by Cutty Sharp View Post
    Well, we cook stuff ourselves to avoid eating artifical stuff, don't we? Sorry, but cooking with Dr Pepper & rootbeer just sounds off.
    Getting more and more off topic, but we don't all cook for the same reasons. Eating all natural is nice, but braising your pork with some soda isn't going to hurt anyone and it's damn tasty.

  2. #12
    Quote Originally Posted by Andrew H View Post
    Getting more and more off topic
    Nothing off topic!

  3. #13

    ecchef's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl View Post
    Dr. Pepper
    +1. Try to get the Dublin Dr. Pepper. Made with cane sugar rather than corn syrup. How's that for natural.
    Though I could not caution all I still might warn a few; Don't raise your hand to raise no flag atop no ship of fools. - Robert Hunter

  4. #14
    Braising with soda (to me) is kinda like stir fry sauces with ketchup. If it works, why not!

  5. #15
    Quote Originally Posted by ecchef View Post
    +1. Try to get the Dublin Dr. Pepper. Made with cane sugar rather than corn syrup. How's that for natural.
    Sounds a bit better, but still a bit bizarre. Reminds me of some of the recipes my mom'd pick up from her old women's magazines - the kind designed to boost sales of a particular product, such as 'Hellman's Mayonnaise Cake'

    Quote Originally Posted by JasonD View Post
    Braising with soda (to me) is kinda like stir fry sauces with ketchup. If it works, why not!
    Agree, but I don't like that either. For example, you can find recipes for pad thai with ketchup, but much better to make a traditional sauce with tamarind.

  6. #16
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    Sounds really interesting. I've had a cola-based bbq before that was good. Root beer sounds better.
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  7. #17
    Senior Member Carl's Avatar
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    At some point "authentic" changes from "how it was done in 1800" to "how it was done in 1950." Some folks grow up with pork and apples, be is apple sauce, apple cider or apple slices. I grew up with pork and Dr Pepper, my grandmothers recipe. It has more to do with memories of home, family and growing up than any high-minded notions of correctness, such as my refusal to use ketchup as a base for my sauces. As much as I love root beer, I don't like strong licorace-y flavors which get emphasized as you reduce it down, so I don't cook with it like that, but I know plenty of folks who do. Of course there's the cola crowd, which I also love with chocolate in place of coffee flavors.

    They're just flavorings. Maybe if I could get them affordably in natural form I'd use them that way, maybe not.
    BBQ Heretic

  8. #18

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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl View Post
    At some point "authentic" changes from "how it was done in 1800" to "how it was done in 1950."
    This is among the reasons why I avoid the word "authentic"...not only does it change, but it implies that other approaches are wrong instead of just different. I try to say, "traditional" and provide some context for what that means in the given scenario.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by Carl View Post
    They're just flavorings. Maybe if I could get them affordably in natural form I'd use them that way, maybe not.
    I agree with this sentiment, but I do like to have control over what else comes along for the ride. For example, if you used supermarket root beer, you get the flavoring, but you also get artificial flavorings, sucrose, high fructose corn syrup, sodium benzoate, phosphoric acid, caramel coloring and red #40.

    A better example comes from my childhood when my mother would make 'chicken tetrazzini' using a recipe straight out of a 50's Junior League cookbook. Instead of a roux or bechamel, she used cans of Campbell's Cream of Mushroom Soup. She didn't know she was also using MSG and all the other junk they put in it.

    I have no axe to grind against any of these products, and would happily enjoy a root beer float at a soda shop, but I wouldn't be dying to cook with them.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by ecchef View Post
    +1. Try to get the Dublin Dr. Pepper. Made with cane sugar rather than corn syrup. How's that for natural.
    Snapple yanked Dr. Pepper away from Dublin. It was a big stink down here, but they own the rights to Dr. Pepper and decided they did not want one plant making better Dr. Pepper than everybody else. They were also coming out with there own "beet" sugar version labeling it as real sugar.

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