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  1. #1
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Smoke for coffee brine

    Hi y'all. I'm about to pull some butts out to tack that I brined in coffee(with some rum, pecans, sugar, vanilla, cumin, foenugreek, citrus, probably something else I'm forgetting). It's greeting slathered with a tamarind based BBQ sauce. Any suggestions on a wood for smoking? I have maple, hickory, apple, cherry, and olive on hand...

  2. #2
    Senior Member AFKitchenknivesguy's Avatar
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    I am partial to hickory and apple for pork.
    Jason

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    Senior Member Carl's Avatar
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    Yo've already gotten some pecans in there, so a nut wood would make the most sense, and pecan wood is exceptional. I'm not accustomed to putting so much into my brines, and I suppose you have salt in it though it's unlisted or it wouldn't be a brine, yes? You can also smoke with coffee grounds as an alternative, again to go with flavors you are already developing. I'm not familiar with the flavor of olive smoke, but maple and/or apple would be my picks from what you listed.
    BBQ Heretic

  4. #4
    Quote Originally Posted by brainsausage View Post
    Hi y'all. I'm about to pull some butts out to tack that I brined in coffee(with some rum, pecans, sugar, vanilla, cumin, foenugreek, citrus, probably something else I'm forgetting). It's greeting slathered with a tamarind based BBQ sauce. Any suggestions on a wood for smoking? I have maple, hickory, apple, cherry, and olive on hand...
    Of those woods, I personally have not used maple or hickory. But I recall having smelled maple and it smelled like what I expected it to smell like - slightly sweet and syrupy.

    I certainly have my personal favorites when it comes to certain products (I prefer peach wood and a little hickory for pork), but, with all the different and unique flavors in your brine, you may want to consider what kind of flavor you want to highlight. Because you brined the pork, the flavor should be deeper than using a rub.

    The maple should lend a sweet flavor that would complement the rum, pecan, sugar and vanilla. The hickory will probably bring out a little more of the cumin and coffee because it lends a nuttiness to food. (I'm trying to remember what fenugreek smells like; I read that it's a cross between celery and maple. If so, the maple may mellow the celery flavor of the fenugreek.) Both apple and cherry would bring a fruity quality to the meat and may go well with your sauce, depending on what's in the sauce.

    And, if you can't decide, just smell the wood and smell the brine/pork. Go with the wood that smells good to you.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  5. #5
    I would agree apple would be the choice from what you listed. Pecan if you can find it would be great. Both would go well with the sweetness of your brine. Hickory is a good all purpose wood, but a little more pungent. I'd stay away from the olive...it has a heavier smoke.

  6. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by AFKitchenknivesguy View Post
    I am partial to hickory and apple for pork.
    I use 2 oz. of each in my Cookshack smoker. I like the mix.

  7. #7
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Thanks for all the suggestions. Yes there is both salt and instacure in the brine... I'm trying to accentuate the nutty, earthy qualities of the coffee, and the slather will be on the sweeter side to help balance that. Think I'll go with apple and maple. Wish I had some pecan now though... I've heard of people smoking with peanut shells before- what about nuts themselves? Or would the excess oil give off a bitter smoke?

  8. #8

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Actually, pecan hulls are great for smoking as well...they are used for that quite a lot in Louisiana in particular.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  9. #9
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwiefel View Post
    Actually, pecan hulls are great for smoking as well...they are used for that quite a lot in Louisiana in particular.
    Any idea about the actual nuts themselves? It obviously wouldn't be cost effective to use just pecans, but I was thinking in conjunction with the apple and maple...

  10. #10

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    I've never heard of anyone just using the nutmeat itself, but sometimes people put the whole nut on the fire--I'm told you should crack them first as they will pop and might throw a coal/ember someplace unfortunate.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

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