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Thread: Help needed.

  1. #11
    Welcome to KKF and good luck with your search for new knives.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Johnny.B.Good's Avatar
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    Welcome to the forum!

  3. #13
    Senior Member Chefdog's Avatar
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    Also check out japaneseknifeimports.com and look for Jon's videos on sharpening. It'll show you a good technique and get started on the right foot.
    Have fun!

  4. #14

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Welcome! You'll be hard pressed to find a better resource for anything related to high-performance knives...and everyone is super nice too.

    Here are some useful YouTube links with content from folks in the forum:
    http://www.youtube.com/user/JKnifeImports
    http://www.youtube.com/user/PCCkitchen
    http://www.youtube.com/user/Saltydog55252
    http://www.youtube.com/user/burkecutlery
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  5. #15

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Lucretia View Post
    "An Edge in the Kitchen by Chad Ward. A lot of the information in this book is available somewhere on line, too, but I don't see the link right off.
    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    Chad Ward's "An Edge in the Kitchen": http://www.amazon.com/An-Edge-Kitche...dp/0061188484/

    Everything you are interested in is in this book.

    Rick
    Bit off topic of this thread but....what do you all think of this quote from the linked article:

    "...if you have a new Arkansas stone, a diamond stone or a synthetic stone, go ahead and use it without oil or water. It will work much better."

    He did say later on in the article that this does not apply to Japanese Waterstones.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  6. #16
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    I do believe that is just plain wrong, and will damage the edge.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

  7. #17
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwiefel View Post
    Bit off topic of this thread but....what do you all think of this quote from the linked article:

    "...if you have a new Arkansas stone, a diamond stone or a synthetic stone, go ahead and use it without oil or water. It will work much better."
    You're taking that out of context. The entire passage is:

    Oil or Water?

    Everyone knows you need to lubricate your sharpening stone with water or oil, right? So the question is which one is better. Neither. The purpose of a sharpening stone is to grind the edge and remove metal. Oil reduces friction and makes the process much slower.

    Supposedly oil helps float away metal particles that would otherwise clog the pores of the stone. You can do the same thing by wiping the stone with a damp cloth when you’re done. Steve Bottorff reports that you can clean your Arkansas stones with paint thinner. Synthetic stones clean up with a scouring pad and abrasive cleanser.

    According to Joe Talmadge, if you have already used oil on your Arkansas stone, you’ll probably need to keep using oil. But if you have a new Arkansas stone, a diamond stone or a synthetic stone, go ahead and use it without oil or water. It will work much better.

    John Juranitch reports that in his company’s work with meat processing plants they discovered that the metal filings suspended in the oil on a stone actually chip and abrade the edge. Although these chips were only visible through a microscope, the meatpackers readily noticed the difference between the knives sharpened on a dry stone and those sharpened on oiled stones.

    Waterstones are another matter entirely. Both Japanese and synthetic waterstones require water in order to cut effectively. Japanese waterstones can be damaged if used dry and must be soaked thoroughly before use. Waterstones wear very quickly, revealing new layers of cutting abrasive as the swarf builds up and is washed away. That’s why they are so effective. There is always a new layer of sharp abrasive cutting away at the metal of your edge. By the way, “swarf” is one of those cool terms you get to toss around when you discuss sharpening. Swarf is the slurry of metal filings and stone grit that builds up as you sharpen. Throw that into your next cocktail party conversation and just watch the expressions of awe appear as people realize that you are a sharpening God.
    If you doubt it, try it.

    Rick

  8. #18

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    You're taking that out of context. The entire passage is:
    If you doubt it, try it.
    Rick
    My question was an honest one, I found the suggestion surprising....which usually means one of: "it's BS" or "I'm about to learn something interesting"

    I don't understand how I took the quote out of context...it certainly wasn't my intent, was just keeping it succint. I guess it's true that I made it appear that Chad Ward is the source of the quote instead of Joe Talmadge...is that what you mean? I didn't (and don't) care about the attribution, only the content.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwiefel View Post
    My question was an honest one, I found the suggestion surprising....which usually means one of: "it's BS" or "I'm about to learn something interesting"

    I don't understand how I took the quote out of context...it certainly wasn't my intent, was just keeping it succint. I guess it's true that I made it appear that Chad Ward is the source of the quote instead of Joe Talmadge...is that what you mean? I didn't (and don't) care about the attribution, only the content.
    The content is correct. An Arkansas stone works better dry, as do DMT or Atoma diamond plates or synthetic stones like India stones. It's easy enough to prove for yourself if you have one of the stones mentioned.

  10. #20
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    If you use them dry they load up so fast that they won't cut, in my experience. There is also some research that shows that using a diamond plate dry will cause damage to the crystalline structure of the steel, but I would have to dig around some to find it, a guy names Brent Beach has written about it over on the Old Tools list.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

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