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Thread: Need help planning a weekly family menu

  1. #11
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    You might want to try your local library, too. There are LOTS of diabetic cookbooks out there.

    The American Diabetes Association also has recipes on line. Don't know how they are as far as kidney-friendly, or what your mom's limits are on carbohydrate intake, but it's a place to start.
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  2. #12
    Senior Member Shinob1's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucretia View Post
    You might want to try your local library, too. There are LOTS of diabetic cookbooks out there.

    The American Diabetes Association also has recipes on line. Don't know how they are as far as kidney-friendly, or what your mom's limits are on carbohydrate intake, but it's a place to start.
    Didn't even consider the library! I think people use to go to those back in the 1900s. I bet they have cookbooks that are specific for kidney disease too. My mother was given one by a friend and I browsed it briefly. I guess a lot of people with kidney disease are diabetic? From what I saw, a lot of the kidney friendly recipes followed what I assume is diabetic diet guidelines, lower carb, no sugar, salt etc.

    I checked that site too and that was a great place to start. I'll read up over the weekend and see if a recipe or two would be something my mom would enjoy. The trick will be finding something that I can make for cheap.

  3. #13

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    Quote Originally Posted by Pensacola Tiger View Post
    AJ,

    What success, if any, have you had using the glycemic index to determine food choice?

    Rick
    I don't use it per se. Goal is to minimize carbohydrates and maximize fiber. When you concentrate on fiber you end up eating the same foods as if you were selecting with the glycemic index.

    -AJ

  4. #14
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shinob1 View Post
    Didn't even consider the library! I think people use to go to those back in the 1900s.
    Ah, grasshopper, go to the library and prepare to be amazed! I can't tell you how many recommended cookbooks have been checked out of the library for evaluation. Saved $$$ on ones that didn't look that wonderful in person. They also have these amazing moving pictures that you can check out! (1900s. Hmmph. Whippersnapper. )

    Quote Originally Posted by Shinob1 View Post
    I guess a lot of people with kidney disease are diabetic?
    Actually, a lot of people who are diabetic get kidney disease...and heart disease...and nerve damage...and the list goes on...it's a horrible, horrible illness.

    Cabbage is wonderful and cheap, as are eggs. Soups can be your friend. Cauliflower can be a decent substitute for potatoes (or rice, if you chop it finely). If you're going to have grains, have whole grains. AJ called it--minimize carbohydrates, maximize fiber. If you can get your mom to exercise at all (walking is perfect) it really helps control your sugar.
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  5. #15
    My grandmother had a lot of those same problems: kidney disease and diabetic. If I remember correctly, the doctor did give her papers with foods ranked on it, though I'm sure they are long gone now. I would ask for something like that if you go to the doctor's with her. The library, as mentioned, is also another noteworthy place to search. For budget, someone else mentioned this as well, but hit up the ethnic markets. A way to save on not adding a lot of salt, is by adding other spices. Indian markets have amazing deals on bulk spices, so much so, that you'll be hard pressed to spend $15 getting everything you see. For fish, the best deals I've seen have been at asian markets. Granted it won't be halibut, but you'll get fresh fish, if you know when it gets delivered, that won't break the bank. I think one thing that will help out cooking in bulk, is to do soups, as they often taste better the next day, and the variety can be endless. Just make a bunch, put it in individual serving sized containers, and all she'll have to do is heat them up. Good luck, and let us know how things work out! On a side note, I do get veggies pushed on me by people that have gardens in their backyards, as they often get overwhelmed when things actually start to get ripe, and they don't want to go through the hassle of canning or cooking it all at once.

  6. #16
    If you have freezer space you can stock up. I would by bulk fish, but only if it is IQF - not block frozen. If you can buy a small chest freezer now if you don't have one. The price of meats is cheap, but after November will go up considerably and it's going to hurt a lot of people. Buy cases of canned goods, stocks, whatever - seriously - the price of food is going to go ballistic this winter.

  7. #17
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    The failure of the corn crop is going to have some serious consequences.
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  8. #18
    Senior Member lowercasebill's Avatar
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    speak with her doctors.. i assume she is on a low potassium diet for her kidneys there are lists available of what she can and cannot have.. next the diabetes doctor.. there should be handouts available .. check your local hospital/ community college/ high school adult education listing .. you should be able to find free or close to it lectures about living with diabetes.. once you have some basic education ask the endocrinologist for a referral to a registered dietician and consult with her.. once you have a list of the foods that meet all 3 of her limitations post them here and i suspect you will get lots of help.. lastly .. you will have to make some trade-offs and accept the fact that there is no perfect answer.. do the best you can and realize that there is no perfect answer and anything you do is better than what is happening now. good luck.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Shinob1's Avatar
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    Thanks all for the response so far. I'm going to see if I can speak with her doctors and gather some more information. I've had some PMs and emails from some members and greatly appreciate it.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by Shinob1 View Post
    Thanks all for the responses so far. My high level plan is I would do a weekly shopping trip with her and on a Sunday, cook up a weeks worth of meals. So buying in bulk and cooking in bulk is definitely okay with me.

    I agree that the budget will be a major issue. If I have to chip in some money by adding in an extra 50 a month to make due, it wouldn't be the end of the world. However the goal is to be as close as possible to the $150 a month.

    As for the medication, she's on more meds that you can shake a stick at. Recently they have added in medication for the kidney, diabetic, and heart issues. One of the main goals will be to have her not eat processed food, limit salt, and eat a regular amount of meals a day. She loves veggies, fruit, and seafood. So pleasing her will be very easy. The hard part will be being in budget and having enough variety to stick with it.

    Buying in bulk or ethnic groceries, I'll have to look into that. We have Sam's Club, which I think is the same thing as CostCo. I have shopped there before when I was dieting an exercising, but my membership has expired. I'd be willing to renew it if it meant I could stretch a buck for her and obviously I'd benefit from buying in bulk for my meals.

    As for the professional help, I'm going to see about attending some more doctor appointments to fill in the knowledge gaps. I go over her paperwork regularly and will see this weekend if they included information about diet. If not, I'll do some additional research online to get started.
    One of the major issues in acheiving your goal with the limited budget is that the less expensive bulk fillers such as pasta, rice, potatoes and bread, so on and so forth are incredibly not diabetic friendly and those same type items that are diabetic friendly are quite expensive. I suggest legumes, beans, split peas and lentils. These are diabetic friendly and low cost. Add some vegetables and a little meat as a garnish and you can make a huge variety of foods. definitely think ethnic cuisine (Indian and Asian cuisines) have a higher emphasis on vegetables and plant based proteins and these will definitely help with the diabetes and heart disease. I know, I have both. Farmers markets help and you live in Ohio make a weekend trip to the local farms and orchards and see if you can glean the fields after harvest. Go straight to the source if you can. Make a variety of sauces and proteins in advance . When I had time I would make little 300 calorie meals and freeze them in microwavable togo containers. I would spend one day and make 4 or 5 complete meals and divy them up, then I would put them in stacks of 4 or 5 mixed meals. That way I would never eat the same meal in a row. Pull out a couple of meals the day before and micro for 2 minutes and you are good to go. Do the same thing with soups.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

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