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Thread: Need help planning a weekly family menu

  1. #21
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    check out Dlife.com for the diabetes
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  2. #22
    Senior Member Shinob1's Avatar
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    So after some more reading I'm starting to formulate a plan of attack. The common foods that I'm finding that make sense are lower carb veggie, fish protein, and poultry. Chef Son - you mentioned Asian influenced meals, and my mom loves stir-fry. So anything that resembles Chinese food will be a big hit.

    I do have a couple of questions though - what would be the best way to prepare the food? I'm debating if I should steam the veggies vs. saute. If I steamed I'd cut out some fat and some calories, but I am afraid it would just turn out bland. Also, I don't have a steamer, so if I did steam the veg, how should I go about it?

    Second question is creating a stir-fry sauce that is lower in sodium. For myself I finish with a store bought Stir-Fry sauce as a lot of my cooking is semi-homemade. So any ideas on how to create a simple low sodium sauce I can put on a Stir-Fry would be very helpful. This also kinda goes into the seasoning issue. If anyone knows of a seasoning "primer" of sorts, that would be awesome.

    Tentatively and high level my menu plan will look something like this:

    • Fresh fruit plates
    • Salads with berries and or fruit
    • Baked Fish with veggie
    • Saute Chicken & veggie stir-fry
    • Vegetable Soup
    • Whole Grain Pasta with tomato sauce/gravy and turkey meatballs


    The contents of the veggie will be driven off the diabetic and kidney disease lists I'm finding. Things like the top 10 or 15 foods. At some point I'm going to see if I can get her to see a renal nutritionist, but being that she's only stage 3, I'm not sure if it will make it harder to do so since seeing one is not a requirement at stage 3. I'll have to see what I can do on this one, but information on the web and cookbooks is enough to get me going.

  3. #23

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    Metal strainer that fits into a pot with a lid = cheap steamer.

    -AJ

  4. #24
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    You really don't need a lot of liquid to steam your vegetables. 1/4 to 1/2 cup of liquid in the hot pan with the vegetables ,put a lid on it and cook to the desired tenderness. Remember bright color is better for you, don't over cook. You can steam the vegetables in a low sodium chicken broth or vegetable broth. Better if you make your own, that way you know what goes in it. Use the trimmings of the vegetables from the meals you make. Buy your meat on the bone. Save the bones if you do a roast chicken and use that to make chicken stock, always save the bones, make stock and freeze in ice cube trays, remove from the trays when frozen and place in a ziploc bag, take out as needed. Fat is your friend if used in moderation, many vitamins and nutrients are fat soluble, so you need a little to stay health, also fat transports flavor that's why we love fatty foods. Use healthy fats when cooking ( canola for high heat cooking, extra virgin olive oil for finishing)( olive oil doesn't go with Asian food). If you can find it in an Asian market rice bran oil would be the way to go , it is extremely healthy for you and has a neutral flavor.
    For low sodium stir-fry sauce, use low sodium soy sauce, or frankly just use less regular soy. Moderation is the key, smaller portions. 1/2 cup starch, 1 cup vegetables and 3-4 oz of meat and you should be fine. You can indulge in a dessert or something sweet once in a while , have a cheat day or meal. Don't deprive yourself and it will be easier.
    If you make diabetic friendly food than it will automatically help with the kidneys and heart health and vice versa. The menus and theories are pretty close to the same. really check out www.dlife.com there are a lot of doctors and people who will help you and it's free. They have an extensive recipe library and tools that you can use. By the way any vegetable is better than none. stay away from the processed lunch meat, it is really high in sodium and other nasties. hope this helps
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  5. #25

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    You can steam the vegetables in a low sodium chicken broth or vegetable broth. Better if you make your own, that way you know what goes in it.
    Good advice...would also point out that Swanson's makes a very low (maybe "no added"?) sodium "cooking chicken stock." It's made specifically for sauces that will be reduced. Good substitute for homemade if you don't have the time or run out of homemade:

    http://www.amazon.com/Swanson-Chicke...+chicken+stock
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  6. #26

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    Quote Originally Posted by ajhuff View Post
    Metal strainer that fits into a pot with a lid = cheap steamer.

    -AJ
    You can also buy one of these at most grocery stores.

    http://www.amazon.com/Norpro-Large-S...ndable+steamer

    -AJ

  7. #27

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    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    You can indulge in a dessert or something sweet once in a while , have a cheat day or meal. Don't deprive yourself and it will be easier.
    Speaking from experience, this is almost critical. My wife does Weight Watchers. One thing she added to the regular routine of Weight Watchers is a cheat day. Saturday is weigh in day. On Saturdays she eats whatever she wants. Then back to the plan on Sundays. I do a lot better when I join her on Saturdays with her cheat day than if I try to grind it out every day. It's kind of like working overtime but you know you have a vacation coming up next month. It really helps mentally.

    -AJ

  8. #28
    I just saw this thread. I wish I had seen it earlier.

    One thing I will add is FERMENT, FERMENT, FERMENT. Fermented foods are huge in restricted diets like hers, and require no skill to prepare--you just take the food out and eat it.

    However, someone will have to do the fermenting for her, as she is unlikely to keep up with it, and buying good fermented foods gets $$$.

    If she is buying food exclusively with food stamps, and has no other money with which to buy food, and they are giving her $150, something is wrong. To put it in perspective, a single mother with one child IME(in Texas, of course) usually gets about $300, and a family of 4 gets about $500, assuming there is no other money with which to buy food.

    Perhaps check out a local charity of some sort.

  9. #29
    Senior Member Shinob1's Avatar
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    I've started looking at the dlife.com and other websites, and they seem to have a lot of good information. As for the budget, she recieves a monthly check for being on disability, which is around $900 for the month. Between the rent, utilities, price of medication and other bills, she may have $50 extra a month if that. So she has to eat off of her foodstamps for the most part. It's a big reason why I take her out or cook for her once a week, so she can get a good meal in and have enough leftovers for another meal.

  10. #30

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BurkeCutlery View Post
    I just saw this thread. I wish I had seen it earlier.

    One thing I will add is FERMENT, FERMENT, FERMENT. Fermented foods are huge in restricted diets like hers, and require no skill to prepare--you just take the food out and eat it.

    However, someone will have to do the fermenting for her, as she is unlikely to keep up with it, and buying good fermented foods gets $$$.

    If she is buying food exclusively with food stamps, and has no other money with which to buy food, and they are giving her $150, something is wrong. To put it in perspective, a single mother with one child IME(in Texas, of course) usually gets about $300, and a family of 4 gets about $500, assuming there is no other money with which to buy food.

    Perhaps check out a local charity of some sort.
    Eamon....could you give some examples? All i can think of is: sauerkraut, kimchee, beer, and yogurt....doesnt seem very rounded....
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

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