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Thread: tips on polishing

  1. #21
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    You really don't need to go as high as some of these recommendations, in my opinion, unless you want true mirror. For sake of reference, here is a photo of a knife I sanded to 3000 grit, Tanaka damascus nakiri.

  2. #22
    Senior Member cclin's Avatar
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    hi: this maybe a stupid question? what direction when you polish the blade? left-right? up- down? circling motion? or whatever you like??

  3. #23
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    Quote Originally Posted by cclin View Post
    hi: this maybe a stupid question? what direction when you polish the blade? left-right? up- down? circling motion? or whatever you like??
    Follow the current grain/grind marks when cleaning polishing; if changing the polish, sanding along the length of the blade parallel to the edge is easier and looks better, in my opinion.

  4. #24
    Senior Member cclin's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by GlassEye View Post
    Follow the current grain/grind marks when cleaning polishing; if changing the polish, sanding along the length of the blade parallel to the edge is easier and looks better, in my opinion.
    some of my knife very difficute to identify the current grain/grind marks! could you tell me the grain/grind marks on these three??

  5. #25
    Quote Originally Posted by cclin View Post
    some of my knife very difficute to identify the current grain/grind marks! could you tell me the grain/grind marks on these three??
    If you can't see any marks, then I'd say you're free to polish in the direction you want. If you did have marks and wanted to change, I guess you'd have to go low grit to sand off the current marks first by sanding in the direction you want the new marks to go. But anyway, if you go through a series of grits up to a very high one then the marks will vanish. Mirror!

    Quote Originally Posted by GlassEye View Post
    You really don't need to go as high as some of these recommendations, in my opinion, unless you want true mirror. For sake of reference, here is a photo of a knife I sanded to 3000 grit, Tanaka damascus nakiri.
    Thanks for the photo, and you're right. That's quite a polish! Makes me think that over 3000 would just be if you've got a lot of time on your hands and not necessary. If I buy a set, though, I'll still probably try to see how it goes as a set would include lower grits, then a 3k, a 6k and a 12k and might as well use 'em.

    Mr Theory said:

    Quote Originally Posted by ThEoRy View Post
    I'll say this about grit scales, Japanese grit numbers are about double American numbers. So the micro mesh pads I use go up to 12,000 American which is about 24,000 Japanese. That's pretty frigging mirrory.
    I don't know if this is right as a few searches have shown different results on the Jpn-US correlation and made it appear very unpredictable to me, but if it is correct then 3000 grit micro-mesh would be 6000 with a Japanese stone, which of course does give a nice polish on an edge and I think would be fine for me.

    Here's one listing from user Smokintbird on straightrazorplace.com:

    http://www.straightrazorplace.com/fo...ug-11-2009.pdf

    Other sources show various results grit comparison results, so I don't know what to think and am not too concerned. If the above is how a 3000 looks then sounds good.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Birnando's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Cutty Sharp View Post
    I don't know if this is right as a few searches have shown different results on the Jpn-US correlation and made it appear very unpredictable to me, but if it is correct then 3000 grit micro-mesh would be 6000 with a Japanese stone, which of course does give a nice polish on an edge and I think would be fine for me.

    Here's one listing from user Smokintbird on straightrazorplace.com:

    http://www.straightrazorplace.com/fo...ug-11-2009.pdf

    Other sources show various results grit comparison results, so I don't know what to think and am not too concerned. If the above is how a 3000 looks then sounds good.
    Yes, the grit conversion between various standards, and materials, is a right mess

    Both in polishing and honing it is about testing and trying various systems until one finds what does the needful really

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by cclin View Post
    some of my knife very difficute to identify the current grain/grind marks! could you tell me the grain/grind marks on these three??
    Remember if you polish Damascus you'll need to re etch to get the pattern back

  8. #28
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    Wet dry paper is inexpensive,also an autobody trick is sanding in one direction,not equal pressure back & forth,,like trail edge sharpening or leather strop.Polished out the Polyurethane on a Koa table to 2000 using this tech.

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithsaltydog View Post
    Wet dry paper is inexpensive,also an autobody trick is sanding in one direction,not equal pressure back & forth,,like trail edge sharpening or leather strop.Polished out the Polyurethane on a Koa table to 2000 using this tech.
    PHOTOS PLEASE
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  10. #30
    ^ What he said.

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