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Thread: Steeling alternative

  1. #1
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Steeling alternative

    Hi y'all,

    So I'm looking to do away with my ceramic steel, and I'd like some suggestions as to what would be a good alternative for daily realignment between sharpening sessions. I'm about to pick up a bestor 1200, and the rika 5k. Should I roll with a strop for finishing/touch ups? Or a higher grit stone? (I'm not looking for a highly polished edge btw, tooth and longevity are more useful to me)The majority of knives I use during the day are in the 61-64 HRC range, btw. Appreciate any suggestions!

    Cheers,

    -Josh

  2. #2
    Senior Member K-Fed's Avatar
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    Stropping on a finishing stone, the rika is pretty much that sweet spot for tooth and refinement imho and all I've been using lately to finish with, works great if you're looking to keep that kind of edge going. a strop with a coarser compound works well too. My favorite right now is loaded with 3 micron natural diamond.

  3. #3
    Senior Member zitangy's Avatar
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    You have to realize the grit of the ceramic rd. that is the key as it will determine how abrasive it is. IF the edge is already rounded off due to all the cutting action, more steel removal would be required ans you would want to do it fast and use an appropriate grit.

    A fine ceramic rod should be in teh region of 1000+ grit and I do use it to remove burrs and also a light touch up on it should the strop not be effective when the degradation calls for more steel removal, followed by on the strop .I also suspect that and you knock off the burrs, the edge will be slightly rounded

    hence it wld be a useful tool to have around.

    rgds
    d

  4. #4
    I dont use anything inbetween sessions, just sharpen when the knife gets dull.

    Can get 5 full shifts out of shigefusa, so a week. If have crazy weeks, then have other blades in rotation so can actually go 5 weeks without the need to sharpen.

  5. #5
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bieniek View Post
    I dont use anything inbetween sessions, just sharpen when the knife gets dull.

    Can get 5 full shifts out of shigefusa, so a week. If have crazy weeks, then have other blades in rotation so can actually go 5 weeks without the need to sharpen.
    What's your sharpening routine Michal?

  6. #6
    Senior Member gentlecook's Avatar
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    I sharpen my Yoshikane SLD suji every working morning,
    need to cut a lot of fish and rolls.

    im beginer in sharpening
    but this new knife lasted for about two days on our sushi-bar.

    wanna try carbon suji to compare with this SLD.

  7. #7
    Rarely DMT to begin with, but if theres some serious thinning [like Ive been lazy for few weeks with thinning] to be done, I just found that as a rule of thumb thinning takes more time then you have planned for it. So when thinning, Im beginning with the diamond plate.

    If its my regular knife then I work blades sides a little with my next stone in progression - JNS 1K.
    Then I am sharpening edge with same stone. Always finish with alternated strokes one per side x10 and reducing pressure.
    But the pressure part is tricky you must know your knife.

    Then I take it to my strop which is cheap piece of leather I trimmed, glued to a piece of wood which is also my deburring block and I strop only 1 stroke per side.
    Leather costed me nothing and I believe for kitchen knives you dont need anything over that!

    Deburring.

    Go to my next stone - this is white binsui. I dont know the grit, anyway I use around 6K nagura on it, and begin by polishing sides. That produces more mud which in turn makes the sharpening better.

    So i finish off the edge, strop, deburr, go back to the stone for some more alternating strokes, and strop again. Dont do more than one stroke per side with strop but im paying ultra close attention to details.

    Usually this is where I stop, after 15 minutes or so.

  8. #8
    A fine stone. I find a strop to be a good maintenance tool if you are at home and very careful, but it's really not going to bring back an edge, only provide it with some different qualities, in a professional setting.

    The best tool for the job is a JNat that you like a lot. The only issue is finding it(and often, paying for it). I have yet to find a synthetic splash-n-go that I like above 2k, so if you tote you knives too and from work, you can keep a stone soaking at home.

  9. #9
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    I use a Dickeron polished 12inch steel. It realigns without any sort of sharpening as the surface is completely smooth. Another nonabrasive option would be a high quality borosilicate rod. It will realign the edge without any kind of abrasion. Given your 61-64 blades, a borosilicate rod would be the best option... although I doubt any kind of rod is very useful at HRC64. No problem at HRC61. Either option will run you 100+ dollars.

  10. #10
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
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    Yep have been waiting for a few mo. for the borosilicate rod's to get back in stock.
    Chewie's the man.

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