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Thread: Question: How to time dishes to be finished at the same time

  1. #11
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    Timing how long each item takes is critical; also, cook consistently, paying attention to the level of the flame, pan, how hot the pan is, quantity of oil, quantity of product, etc.

    If you roughly know how long each item takes, make a graph/diagram/sheet with the time that it takes each item to cook, like an x/y graph with the x (horizontal) being zero (or time to be done) and the y (vertical) going upwards being the amount of time it takes to cook. Then you'll see which food takes the longest, then after how many minutes you need to start the next, and then the next and so on.

    Or just write a list down of the estimated times, go from longest to shortest, and the difference between each is how long you need to cook the longer item before starting the next item. Flipping, turning, etc. can all be noted in these lists as well. Then get a timer and start.

    And a warm oven is invaluable. +1 to no plastic if the oven is over 250 ish. I've used plastic wrap in the oven around 200. It has a higher melting temperature than 200, but I haven't used it in an oven above 250 out of fear of it melting.
    Michael
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  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by mhlee View Post
    ... If you roughly know how long each item takes, make a graph/diagram/sheet with the time that it takes each item to cook, like an x/y graph with the x (horizontal) being zero (or time to be done) and the y (vertical) going upwards being the amount of time it takes to cook. ... Or just write a list down of the estimated times, go from longest to shortest, and the difference between each is how long you need to cook the longer item before starting the next item. Flipping, turning, etc. can all be noted in these lists as well. Then get a timer and start.
    Whoa, timing can be so difficult even when cooking at home and I remember how in a resto you need an absurd amount of concentration to get it right. With this, I like the time-line idea too. You can draw these out if you want, as just said. I've never done it, but I visualise finishing points for dishes this way, and when to start things so it all synchs together. It's fun and great when it works out.

    But I'm another one who has to say - good god! - what was it? 4-5 eggs and pound of bacon for two people for breakfast! A pound? Sorry, but that's insane, a health emergency, and I hope you're exaggerating. Why don't you drastically cut back and do one single 'wave' of bacon? (You mentioned you fry in waves; I'm picturing a tsunami of bacon at the moment.) Also, you said you do 5 eggs but only 2-3 at a time. Much easier to cook this: 1 bacon wave, 1 egg wave of 2-3 eggs, your hash browns, and then have a salad already prepped to go with it all, vegs cut and kept crisp in the fridge, and when all hot food ready just toss with your dressing. Seriously, my wife is pregnant and eating plenty now, and I eat enough too, and I would only use 2 eggs for our shared omelette for breakfast, 1-2 potatoes and a fraction of the bacon, maybe 3 or 4 strips/person (though she doesn't eat bacon anyway).

  3. #13

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    How 'bout a Power Point presentation? LOL

  4. #14

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    Why not?

  5. #15

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    Well, it's not much more trouble than some of the gyrations being suggested for frying some potatoes, bacon and eggs, so....why not? ;-)

  6. #16

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    Still can't shake this image of 'waves of bacon' for breakfast. Though maybe this isn't what was meant, it should simply some of our timeline issues.


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  7. #17

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    Oh boy. I'm gonna rush out and buy several of those bacon gadgets. <g>

  8. #18

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    Do it. But you'll need more than one if you want waves of bacon.

  9. #19
    Senior Member Carl's Avatar
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    A pound of bacon doesn't sound like a lot, and 4-5 eggs doesn't either, but maybe it's where I'm from and what I grew up eating. For 2 folks that's 8oz of bacon, about 3-4oz cooked, and 2-2 1/2 eggs. Sounds about right to me. Add a pound of potatos, half a pound each, don't forget the white pepper gravy. Yeah, sounds like a meal to me.
    BBQ Heretic

  10. #20

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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl View Post
    A pound of bacon doesn't sound like a lot, and 4-5 eggs doesn't either, but maybe it's where I'm from and what I grew up eating. For 2 folks that's 8oz of bacon, about 3-4oz cooked, and 2-2 1/2 eggs. Sounds about right to me. Add a pound of potatos, half a pound each, don't forget the white pepper gravy. Yeah, sounds like a meal to me.
    You're right, I think, about how much 'sounds like a meal' and about it having to do with where you are. My first time in Asia lasted about 3-4 years, and then I returned home and went to a Vietnamese restaurant and was kind of shocked - why have they given us double? - must be some mistake and I don't want to pay for a double order ... oh, well I guess that's their normal portion, how can we eat all this? It seemed funny and a bit obscene all that food, even though of course it was no surprise.

    Anyway, it wasn't that the normal Asian portions were too small, it was that the Canadian portions were too big. First, I don't know about others but I wouldn't think of eating as much bacon as I would, say, beef. Just 3 or 4 strips maybe; don't know how many ounces that is. Bacon's about flavour not about filling you up, to me at least, and not the healthiest thing if you want to eat more. Anyway, the American Cancer Society says, 'the amount of meat recommended as part of a healthy meal is 3 to 4 ounces – it will look about the same size as a deck of cards,' so a half pound of bacon for 2 people would probably be tops. However, if you're eating eggs with it you don't need that much, and I think you also don't need a normal portion of eggs, which is 2 per person. If you're doubling all these portions it sounds like the supersize syndrome.

    Keep in mind I'm currently writing this from Korea, and so all that protein with potato (1 pound?) sounds like a lot. If you go to a Korean BBQ resto here the standard portion size per person is 150g or about 5oz, so a bit excessive, but it's considered a 'special night out' kind of meal. A normal meal type of dish might have 1 egg in it for protein or a small amount of tofu in most cases. People fill up on vegs and rice, of course.

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