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Thread: Have any one ever used ceramic knife? Super Cool!

  1. #31
    For under $30, a ceramic knife may not be such a bad deal. But as a long time Kyocera user, I can confidently state the £45 knife described in the Telegraph article will not perform as well as a comparably-priced Japanese steel knife. The Kyocera may indeed hold an edge for a longer period, but that edge won't be nearly as sharp.

    I've been using carbon steel knives for a while now and haven't encountered the problems with corrosion that the author describes. I think it may only be a problem for cooking professionals who cut large quantities of corrosive food in a single session.

  2. #32
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by naia View Post
    no metal, won't oxidize food. I believe so.

    Take a look at the following

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddr...ic-knives.html
    http://www.myceramicknives.com/my-30...p-apples-fresh
    Just cuz I like to stir things up once in awhile...

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/201...-theyre-rotten

  3. #33
    Senior Member K-Fed's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brainsausage View Post
    Just cuz I like to stir things up once in awhile...

    http://www.npr.org/blogs/thesalt/201...-theyre-rotten
    Good read. I'll stick with a sharp knife and acidulated water. Never had issues with browning.

  4. #34
    Senior Member mpukas's Avatar
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    Funny this topic just popped up, as I been wondering about sharpening ceramic knives - is it possible w/ water or oil stones?

    I don't own one, but I've been seeing them in the media for years. Prolly the first time I saw one was on Ming Tsai's cooking show years ago. HE raved about how sharp they were. My biggest concern way back then was the knives he was using were so small. Like a 5-6" chef's knife. I was using an old Wusthof 8" chef's knife, and that was too small for me back then.

    I think the biggest reason they're popular among the unwashed masses - apart from celeb endorsements - is that they are in fact sharper that what most people are used to in a kitchen knife. And they stay sharper longer than most crap steel knives found haphazardly jostling around in kitchen junk drawers along with other random utensils. Therefore, they don't need to be sharpened very often, if ever. Most happy homemakers don't even know how to steel a knife properly, let alone sharpen a knife, and most cant' even be bothered to send their knives out to a "professional" in a van with some grinding belts.
    Shibui - simplicity devoid of unnecessary elements

  5. #35
    Senior Member mpukas's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by naia View Post
    no metal, won't oxidize food. I believe so.

    Take a look at the following

    http://www.telegraph.co.uk/foodanddr...ic-knives.html
    http://www.myceramicknives.com/my-30...p-apples-fresh
    Re: the Original Troll's linked articles, the first one won't open for me.

    The 2nd artcle demonstrates my point in my previous post about ceramic knives being sharper than the average in home steel knife.

    In the artcle, the apple slices cut by the “$150, newly sharpened Henkels knife” (note the spelling) are browning because the knife is not sharp. We don’t know how the knife was “sharpened,” and I’m willing to bet it’s not remotely sharp. That knife is stainless and will not react to or with food. The ceramic knife is probably considerably sharper thus doing less damage to the cells during the cut. An apple cut by any non-sharp knife will have more damaged and ruptured cells rather than cleanly sliced cells, resulting in faster oxidation.

    Just look at the slices in the first pic – the slice on the left has a rougher texture than the slice on the left cut by the ceramic knife. That rougher texture indicates a dull knife and will oxidize faster.

    Not to say that certain metals won’t react with certain foods – we all know the stories of certain cladded knives and cabbage, etc.

    Now is there any potential health hazard of metal reacting with food? Dr. Mercola (whom I’m going to label as fairly “radical” in terms of health & nutrition) advocates using ceramic cookware, because he believes that when metal is heated, it can transfer heavy metal elements to food which are toxic to ingest. He’s not alone in this belief. He does, however, say that when metal is not heated, such as a SS pan, there is no health hazard. So, one could assume that since we don’t heat our knives when we cut, there is no health hazard. Is there a health hazard when we cut a hot piece of protein, such as a roast? That’s a good question, but I assume “NO” because any hot food item being cut is no going to be hot enough (125-170d?) to compare to that of a skillet on a stove (350d+).
    Shibui - simplicity devoid of unnecessary elements

  6. #36
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    i wouldn't pee on Joseph Mercola if he were on fire and begged me to.

  7. #37
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mpukas View Post
    Re: the Original Troll's linked articles, the first one won't open for me.

    The 2nd artcle demonstrates my point in my previous post about ceramic knives being sharper than the average in home steel knife.

    In the artcle, the apple slices cut by the “$150, newly sharpened Henkels knife” (note the spelling) are browning because the knife is not sharp. We don’t know how the knife was “sharpened,” and I’m willing to bet it’s not remotely sharp. That knife is stainless and will not react to or with food. The ceramic knife is probably considerably sharper thus doing less damage to the cells during the cut. An apple cut by any non-sharp knife will have more damaged and ruptured cells rather than cleanly sliced cells, resulting in faster oxidation.

    Just look at the slices in the first pic – the slice on the left has a rougher texture than the slice on the left cut by the ceramic knife. That rougher texture indicates a dull knife and will oxidize faster.

    Not to say that certain metals won’t react with certain foods – we all know the stories of certain cladded knives and cabbage, etc.

    Now is there any potential health hazard of metal reacting with food? Dr. Mercola (whom I’m going to label as fairly “radical” in terms of health & nutrition) advocates using ceramic cookware, because he believes that when metal is heated, it can transfer heavy metal elements to food which are toxic to ingest. He’s not alone in this belief. He does, however, say that when metal is not heated, such as a SS pan, there is no health hazard. So, one could assume that since we don’t heat our knives when we cut, there is no health hazard. Is there a health hazard when we cut a hot piece of protein, such as a roast? That’s a good question, but I assume “NO” because any hot food item being cut is no going to be hot enough (125-170d?) to compare to that of a skillet on a stove (350d+).
    I was thinking the exact same thing in terms of sharpness when I viewed that link.

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