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Help me get my 1st yanagi! Becoming sushi chef. - Page 2
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Thread: Help me get my 1st yanagi! Becoming sushi chef.

  1. #11

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    Japanese Knife Imports. It's going to be your favorite place, I assure you. You need in person expertise, and your boss(sensai) sounds like he has a way of doing things, and it might be best to just do as you are told at work. But if you want to learn more, as I did, Jon will be your guy, and it would be a bleeding shame to not take advantage of his store being in driving distance to you. Sharpening a knife with a Hamaguri edge is a complex topic to put into words, but with a person standing there with you, it can be a snap. I knew a lot about it, but I didn't get good results until a video-call I was on with Jon maybe a year ago. Makes it real easy to just point and show the knife and do it with you.

    I find Hamaguri edges to be easier to touch up and sharpen, and help keep the edge profile straight. I have not seen chefs keep a knife with a dead-flat blade road that haven't screwed up their profiles(sometimes in one sharpening session). I am sure they are out there, but I've never seen it.

    Getting a good lefty Yanagiba is going to be tough. They are often gimmicky cheapos or $1,000+. But, given his connections, I am sure Jon can help you out.

  2. #12

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    Quote Originally Posted by BurkeCutlery View Post
    Japanese Knife Imports. It's going to be your favorite place, I assure you. You need in person expertise, and your boss(sensai) sounds like he has a way of doing things, and it might be best to just do as you are told at work. But if you want to learn more, as I did, Jon will be your guy, and it would be a bleeding shame to not take advantage of his store being in driving distance to you. Sharpening a knife with a Hamaguri edge is a complex topic to put into words, but with a person standing there with you, it can be a snap. I knew a lot about it, but I didn't get good results until a video-call I was on with Jon maybe a year ago. Makes it real easy to just point and show the knife and do it with you.

    I find Hamaguri edges to be easier to touch up and sharpen, and help keep the edge profile straight. I have not seen chefs keep a knife with a dead-flat blade road that haven't screwed up their profiles(sometimes in one sharpening session). I am sure they are out there, but I've never seen it.

    Getting a good lefty Yanagiba is going to be tough. They are often gimmicky cheapos or $1,000+. But, given his connections, I am sure Jon can help you out.
    Burke thank you so much for your reply! Now i cant wait for jon to get back from japan so i could head over to his store. I was definetly going to ask him if he could show me exactly how to get a hamaguri edge cause when im reading on it, it is kind of confusing on paper.
    My blade road is definetly not flat flat and i did mess up my profile alot... Im guessing hamaguri would be alot easier to maintain and quicker to sharpen plus i wont be wasting as much metal as per flattening my knife.
    Thank you so much for your reply!

  3. #13
    Senior Member K-Fed's Avatar
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    Tanaka would be good to look into. I picked up a lefty deba from yee who shalt not be named and while the handle is pretty simple and utilitarian ( just a large oval ) the grind both blade road and ura are great. Also, at ~250 bones it left enough loot in my wallet to have it rehandled should I choose to do so.





  4. #14

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    I like my tanaka a ton, but its blue steel, and if I could do it again, I'd want white #2 steel and a permasoaking Sigma Power II 10k stashed away.

  5. #15
    Senior Member
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    A- Frames carries some very good yanagi's,I got a blue steel Aritsugu 270 fr. him yrs. ago cut alot of sashimi & sushi topping wt. that blade.

    There is nothing like one on one for learning sharpening so if you can get a yanagi(lefty)fr. Jon & learn his tech.,put it to the test & see how it works for you on the job.

    Even in Japan all Yanagi sharpening is not the same,some chef's prefer diff. types of bevels.I was taught fingerpads on bladeroad,pushing till it bites into stone,check your spine height & sharpen at this angle,its not a straight line fr. top of shinogi line to blade edge.My polish lines were usually about 3/16 " wide.Also very important not to overwork the hollow grind side of the blade,it is designed for extremely sharp edges & easy food separation.Fattening out the Urashi can reduce it's effectiveness.Best to just remove your burr. on the backside of a quality yanagi.

    It is a fragile edge,but screaming sharp,just what you want wt. sashimi & sushi topping.Touch up is easy just a few lite strokes on a polishing stone.Using this tech. My only geometry mishap was on my first Yanagi a Susin white steel,over time the tip became too thin,changed tip sharpening & never had that problem wt the Aritsugu.

    When I saw Jon's bevel tech. for yanagi's on video,it was a first for me,another advanced style fr. a Japan sinle bevel sharpener.His burr removal is the same I have been using for yrs.

    It's great that you will be on the job using these wonderful blades,they are a joy to use.Just make sure your blade is straight,& is high quality carbon steel,no friggin stainless

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