Quantcast
Buying advice: 240mm wa-gyuto for a push-cutter
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 36

Thread: Buying advice: 240mm wa-gyuto for a push-cutter

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Zurich, Switzerland
    Posts
    113

    Buying advice: 240mm wa-gyuto for a push-cutter

    Hi, first post here and I already ask for help Thanks in advance!

    Following the questions in the sticky post:
    • What type of knife(s) do you think you want?
      240mm wa-gyuto
    • Why is it being purchased? What, if anything, are you replacing?
      Replacing a Tojiro DP 210mm.
    • What do you like and dislike about these qualities of your knives already?
      Aesthetics- ok, but I prefer wa handles now, and I dislike the printed lettering (hammer-stamped kanji look much better)
      Edge Quality/Retention- chips a bit easily, not amazingly sharp but this is probably mostly my fault (shaves, but not smoothly)
      Ease of Use- ok
      Comfort- ok after rounding the spine, not amazing
    • What grip do you use? pinch grip
    • What kind of cutting motion do you use? mostly push-cutting, sometimes pull, rarely rocking and walking.
    • Where do you store them? drawer with wooden knife support, but I'm changing to magnetic wall mounts soon.
    • Have you ever oiled a handle? no, doesn't sound too daunting though.
    • What kind of cutting board(s) do you use? currently bamboo, getting a mahogany end-grain boardsmith. Will keep using the bamboo for protein.
    • For edge maintenance, do you use a strop, honing rod, pull through/other, or nothing? At the moment I have a smooth steeling rod (Victorinox), but I only see an effect on the few softer knives I have. I might get a strop. I started stropping on newsprint on top of my cutting board after sharpening, and noticed a clear improvement.
    • Have they ever been sharpened? Yes, on an Edge Pro with Chosera stones. I'm still learning the technique but I get a (just) shaving edge.
    • What is your budget? ~250 USD
    • What do you cook and how often? Daily, a lot of vegetables especially onion, shallot, garlic, ginger, spring onion; and some meat and fish.
    • Special requests(Country of origin/type of wood/etc)?
      I think I'd like a sharp tip for precise work like fine dicing onion/garlic.
      I also think I'd prefer some stiffness - flexible sounds like it would make it harder to use the tip. I'm happy with the Tojiro DP stiffness (but not with the tip geometry).

    I've done some research already, came up with the following list of knives that I thought more or less fit my needs, casting a wide net here!

    - Moritaka KS 250mm san-mai Blue Super (I'm aware of the grind issues, but I like the profile, steel, and price point...)
    - Masamoto KS 250mm solid White #2
    - ******** Ultimatum 250mm, 52100 carbon or 19c27 stainless (M390 out of stock)
    - Konosuke HD (a bit confused about the old and new profiles)
    - ******** Laser, solid AEL-B
    - Kanehiro san-mai Aogami Super
    - Takeda Sasanoha Large Blue Super
    - Tanaka Damascus san-mai Blue #2 http://www.ebay.com/itm/Japanese-Dam...-/261105971967
    - Yoshihiro solid kasumi Blue #2 http://www.ebay.com/itm/Hagane-Wa-Gy...-/230834291570
    - Yoshihiro san-mai kurouchi Blue #2: http://www.amazon.com/YOSHIHIRO-Japa...dp/B006TT1LCM/
    - Sakai Yusuke san-mai White #2 http://www.ebay.com/itm/Japanese-Sak...-/380438268745
    - Sakai Ichimonji-Kichikuni kurouchi san-mai White #2 http://www.ebay.com/itm/Japanese-SAK...-/380427703221
    - JCK Fu-Rin-Ka-Zan san-mai White #1 http://japanesechefsknife.com/FurinkazanW1Series.html
    - JCK Kagayagi Blue Super (profile doesn't seem quite right, but I like the steel and look...) http://japanesechefsknife.com/KAGAYA...perSeries.html
    - Monzaburo Blue http://yhst-27988581933240.stores.ya...ade-kn240.html
    - Sadayasu Yellow #2 http://yhst-27988581933240.stores.ya...ade-kn240.html
    - Aritsugu A-Style http://yhst-27988581933240.stores.ya...-wa-gy240.html
    - Azuma Minamoto No Masahisa Wagyuto White #2 http://yhst-27988581933240.stores.ya...ade-kn240.html
    - Azuma Minamoto No Masahisa Tokushu steel (?) http://yhst-27988581933240.stores.ya...yasugi240.html


    Cheers,
    Olivier

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    sachem allison's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    nyc
    Posts
    3,887
    welcome!
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  3. #3
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    2,288
    Welcome! I would also look at the Kochi knives from JKI, they are super thin behind the edge and not flexible...I really like the V2 steel.
    one man gathers what another man spills...

  4. #4
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Norn Iron
    Posts
    1,385
    I think quite a lot of the knives you mention are quite thin so might not be what you're looking for. Zakuris are another option perhaps, you can get a Blue #1 240 for $180 which is very cheap. In your budget quite a lot of knives seem to be pretty thin.

  5. #5
    Senior Member Justin0505's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Minneapolis, MN
    Posts
    1,439
    Have you ever considered a cleaver?
    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...eavers-re-post

    NOTHING push-cuts like a cleaver, and nothing can achieve thinness over so much of the blade while also maintaining good rigidity.
    I've got a few thousand bucks worth of high quality steel from some of the best knife makers in the world hanging around, and the simple truth is that when it comes down to pure push-cut, fall-though-food laserness, nothing beats my $40 CCK that I polished the bevel on.
    If you think that it's too radical a change, then a 180mm nakiri might be a half-way point between gyuto and a full-on "killer license plalte." However, you can find a good quality, entry-level cleaver for less than a nakiri.

    A lot of people get hung up on not having a pointy tip, but what really matters for garlic or other fine dicing is the THINNESS and flatness of the tip. My cleavers and nakiri are my favorite garlic and shallot knives and, IMO, the safest to work out near the tip with b/c all that height gives your knuckles a nice safe place to rest.

    I understand that some people just can't ever get to the state of mind where they think that square is beautiful, but it there's chance that you can, then you should give it a try. I think it would meet your needs well.
    http://youtu.be/mQhMxsRsWUY
    "I gotta tell ya, this is pretty terrific. Ha hahaha, YEAH!" - Moe (w/ 2 knives). http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YVt4U...layer_embedded

  6. #6

    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Ghent, NY
    Posts
    940
    Have you considered a Kiritsuke? They seem to have less belly than a Gyuto.

  7. #7

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    The incredibly sophisticated Boise, ID <g>
    Posts
    907
    Welcome.

  8. #8
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Zurich, Switzerland
    Posts
    113
    Quote Originally Posted by stevenStefano View Post
    I think quite a lot of the knives you mention are quite thin so might not be what you're looking for. Zakuris are another option perhaps, you can get a Blue #1 240 for $180 which is very cheap. In your budget quite a lot of knives seem to be pretty thin.
    I'm not against thin per se - I just worry a bit about flexibility. But really I have no experience of very thin gyutos, so I'm open to trying one if you guys think I'd be fine.

  9. #9
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Zurich, Switzerland
    Posts
    113
    Quote Originally Posted by Justin0505 View Post
    Have you ever considered a cleaver?
    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...eavers-re-post

    NOTHING push-cuts like a cleaver, and nothing can achieve thinness over so much of the blade while also maintaining good rigidity.
    I've got a few thousand bucks worth of high quality steel from some of the best knife makers in the world hanging around, and the simple truth is that when it comes down to pure push-cut, fall-though-food laserness, nothing beats my $40 CCK that I polished the bevel on.
    If you think that it's too radical a change, then a 180mm nakiri might be a half-way point between gyuto and a full-on "killer license plalte." However, you can find a good quality, entry-level cleaver for less than a nakiri.

    A lot of people get hung up on not having a pointy tip, but what really matters for garlic or other fine dicing is the THINNESS and flatness of the tip. My cleavers and nakiri are my favorite garlic and shallot knives and, IMO, the safest to work out near the tip with b/c all that height gives your knuckles a nice safe place to rest.

    I understand that some people just can't ever get to the state of mind where they think that square is beautiful, but it there's chance that you can, then you should give it a try. I think it would meet your needs well.
    http://youtu.be/mQhMxsRsWUY
    Actually, I was incomplete in answering the standard questions. I use a cleaver already! It's a cheap, fairly large carbon steel number I got from my local Chinese grocery store (it's the same as in this post: http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...dentify-please). It works well and is quite thin behind the edge; fit and finish is inexistent obviously, and it's not quite flat enough. But I'm having fun using it all the same. I use a two-finger grip with it.

    I'm sure I'll get a nicer cleaver eventually

    However, for now I was planning to get a gyuto, as there are things I still prefer doing with a thinner and longer knife. Cutting across larger vegetables, slicing things, and precise tip work come to mind (despite what you say, I find the cleaver blocks my view of the right side of the product a bit too much for tip work).

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Oct 2012
    Location
    Zurich, Switzerland
    Posts
    113
    Quote Originally Posted by Mike9 View Post
    Have you considered a Kiritsuke? They seem to have less belly than a Gyuto.
    Yes, I noticed... But I'd like to keep the rocking option; as I said above, I also use a cleaver for pure push-cutting.

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts