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Thread: Buying advice: 240mm wa-gyuto for a push-cutter

  1. #11
    My bad - I was going by this part -

    What kind of cutting motion do you use? mostly push-cutting, sometimes pull, rarely rocking and walking.

  2. #12
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    I'd look at the gesshin kagero. The knife has a nice French profile and the steel is really sweet. You'll have to wait until John gets back.

  3. #13
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    those konosuke "funayuki" gyutos that are patterened after carters are nice. in your price range to.

  4. #14
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    Quote Originally Posted by labor of love View Post
    those konosuke "funayuki" gyutos that are patterened after carters are nice. in your price range to.
    Interesting. How tall do they feel? They seem quite a bit taller than the KS profile. And how flexible are they?

  5. #15
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    i had a 240mm when they first came out. it didnt really feel tall or short, just like actual carters. anyway, like all konosukes they run short. so i sold mine and ive been waiting for a 270 quite some time. theres no more flex in them than what is normal for konosukes, but being lasers they do have some flex.

  6. #16
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    just to clarify, by run short i mean the actual edge length on the 240mm is more like 231mm.

  7. #17
    I have the 240mm Tanaka Sekiso Blue Damascus gyuto. It is a touch thicker than some other 240mm's I have tried, but it's got a beautiful convex grind and very thin behind the edge. Cuts very well! It is all carbon, so it will react/patina. Push cutting it does well, but the blade is a bit thicker near the spine, so that may cause some foods to snap when cut, like carrots. It is my favorite knife currently.

  8. #18
    Senior Member wenus2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by James View Post
    I'd look at the gesshin kagero. The knife has a nice French profile and the steel is really sweet. You'll have to wait until John gets back.
    That's a good call, not wa, but otherwise fits very well.
    I've had the pleasure of handling a few, they are very natural in the hand.
    Currently on my short list.
    -Enjoy the ride. *** All statements made herein are my personal opinion and nothing more, regardless of tone or context. ***

  9. #19
    I would take a look at the Gesshin Ginga. I've handled several and they are very nice knives. It's a knife I hope to own very soon.
    Michael
    "Don't you know who he is?"

  10. #20
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    As long as the curvature near the heel is subtle, push-cutting will be fine. I mostly push-cut, myself. I also like pointier tips. Your problem right now is there are too many options. It would help to get pickier so we can narrow things down for you. Do you want stainless, semi or carbon? What is your preferred price range? If you are going to use an edge pro, you ought to get something that does not have a secondary bevel and is thin so your bevels will look less messed up and you won't have to worry about thinning behind the edge for some time. How important is food release to you? Do you have a preferred weight? Would you want the blade to feel heavier or lighter (balance), etc. I would second a Gesshin Ginga stainless. The gyutos aren't flexible so that you notice it during normal use. Don't pry things open with it, basically. I have several of thin knives like this. Once you learn to freehand, or if you want to get a second knife, you can go with carbon or a more beastly knife with a secondary bevel. Just my two cents.

    The Gesshin Ginga is a great balance in terms of steel characteristics, too. It gets very sharp easily, stainless, fairly tough and very good edge holding.

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