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Thread: Buying advice: 240mm wa-gyuto for a push-cutter

  1. #21
    Senior Member K-Fed's Avatar
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    The masahiro virgin carbon might be a good option if western handles aren't an issue. I passed my masahiro to a co worker as a house warming gift and had the pleasure of sharpening it for him today. Takes a great edge and has a flatter profile.

  2. #22
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by K-Fed View Post
    The masahiro virgin carbon might be a good option if western handles aren't an issue. I passed my masahiro to a co worker as a house warming gift and had the pleasure of sharpening it for him today. Takes a great edge and has a flatter profile.
    would a misono swedish be similar to this knife? if so i would go w/the misono just because of the dragon!

  3. #23
    Senior Member K-Fed's Avatar
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    the masahiro is a bit less "pointy" and has a bit flatter edge profile. Here's a picture of mine when I used to own it.

  4. #24
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by labor of love View Post
    would a misono swedish be similar to this knife? if so i would go w/the misono just because of the dragon!
    The Misono Swedish has no flat section at all, sharpens very easily, but edge retention is just average. Comes with an excellent but very convexed edge, they just forgot to ease the shoulders.

  5. #25
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    thanks for clearing that up benuser. even though the misono swed isnt flat, i assume its very light belly would still make it a suitable candidate for push cutting right? its one of those knives ill check out eventually, probably from BST.

  6. #26
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    You're right, it has a very light belly, and would make a great push cutter due to its geometry.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by Taz575 View Post
    I have the 240mm Tanaka Sekiso Blue Damascus gyuto. It is a touch thicker than some other 240mm's I have tried, but it's got a beautiful convex grind and very thin behind the edge. Cuts very well! It is all carbon, so it will react/patina. Push cutting it does well, but the blade is a bit thicker near the spine, so that may cause some foods to snap when cut, like carrots. It is my favorite knife currently.
    That does look like a nice profile; what do you think of the handle? I think I've seen negative comments on the handle somewhere else online.

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    As long as the curvature near the heel is subtle, push-cutting will be fine. I mostly push-cut, myself. I also like pointier tips. Your problem right now is there are too many options. It would help to get pickier so we can narrow things down for you. Do you want stainless, semi or carbon? What is your preferred price range? If you are going to use an edge pro, you ought to get something that does not have a secondary bevel and is thin so your bevels will look less messed up and you won't have to worry about thinning behind the edge for some time. How important is food release to you? Do you have a preferred weight? Would you want the blade to feel heavier or lighter (balance), etc. I would second a Gesshin Ginga stainless. The gyutos aren't flexible so that you notice it during normal use. Don't pry things open with it, basically. I have several of thin knives like this. Once you learn to freehand, or if you want to get a second knife, you can go with carbon or a more beastly knife with a secondary bevel. Just my two cents.

    The Gesshin Ginga is a great balance in terms of steel characteristics, too. It gets very sharp easily, stainless, fairly tough and very good edge holding.
    Ok, you're right, I should tell you more.

    - I'd prefer a carbon or semi-stainless; it would be my second after my cheap Chinese cleaver.
    - My preferred price range would be ~200-250 I guess.
    - Food release is moderately important to me, but the absence of wedging is quite important.
    - Don't worry too much about my Edge Pro; I think there are bench stones in my near future (maybe a Naniwa green brick) as I find the Edge Pro a bit too long to setup, and I also realized it would be a pain with asymmetric knives.
    - Regarding weight, I'm comfortable with my Tojiro's (204g) but would also be fine with something a bit lighter I think. And given that I'm moving from 210 to 240mm, that means rather light knives. One of the reasons I want a wa handle is for the balance point; I think I'd like something a bit more forwards-balanced.

    I see what you mean about flexibility; it seems like I don't need to worry about it too much.

    The Gesshin Ginga seems to not have much of a flat spot at the heel?

  9. #29
    Quote Originally Posted by perneto View Post
    - Don't worry too much about my Edge Pro; I think there are bench stones in my near future (maybe a Naniwa green brick) as I find the Edge Pro a bit too long to setup, and I also realized it would be a pain with asymmetric knives.
    Agreed that you will want some bench stones, but may want to stay away from the Naniwa green brick (assuming the 2k stone you are referring to here)...fine for French/German blades, but I have found it to be somewhat lacking on J-blades...there are much better stones available for the money. Bester 1200 or maybe a Gesshin (1 or 2k) might fill in this stone range better, or maybe get some input from others, but again I wouldn't spend the $ for the green brick, the feel and finish are rather strange.
    one man gathers what another man spills...

  10. #30
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    Perneto,you already have the Tojiro DP & a Cleaver.nothing wrong thin lazors,wt. the right edge they just glide through food.The Sakai white steel 2.2 at the spine is a good blade.Keiichi ships fr. Japan at a very reasonable rate.

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