Quantcast
Quench Container
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Quench Container

  1. #1
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    4,089

    Quench Container

    This is a question for knife-makers on this forum.

    What container do you guys use to oil quench your blades?

    How tall the container need to be to quench efficiently?

    Thanks,

    Marko


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  2. #2
    Delbert Ealy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Indian River, MI Just under The Bridge
    Posts
    1,034
    Mine is a piece of square tube with a steel plate welded to the bottom. I think mine is 20 inches. I would recommend 2 inches longer than the longest blade you plan to make. Larger volume is important if you plan to heat treat more than a few blades at a time.

    Laminated metals specialist, Kitchen knife and gadget maker
    www.ealyknives.com
    www.mokume-jewelry.net
    "Build a man a fire and he will be warm for a day, set a man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life"

  3. #3

    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Posts
    548
    i have an old ammo can for a tank but like dell in will be making a long steel pipe into a tank

  4. #4
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    4,089
    Sounds great. I have a thick porcelain umbrella stand, about 18 inches tall and 10 inch in diameter (holds about 2.5gal of oil) that I plan on using until I get a replacement. I was thinking of getting an old milk can or a fire extinguisher with a cutoff top, but maybe I should look into getting a pipe and have the bottom piece welded to it.

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  5. #5
    StephanFowler's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Acworth, Ga
    Posts
    168
    whatever you use, you will want to be able to cap and seal off the top.

    most metallurgical oils can suffer from humidity over time. Also if you get a flare up the best way to deal with it is to cap it off and starve it of oxygen.

    (I use a 4x4 square tube with a base plate welded on, I am going to a 6" round soon)

  6. #6
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    4,089
    Sorry for a stupid question. Where can one normally get a steel pipe in larger diameter, say 24" long by 10" wide? I looked up prices for steel pipes online and got a whooping $194 quote before shipping for 24x10".

    M


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  7. #7
    Delbert Ealy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Indian River, MI Just under The Bridge
    Posts
    1,034
    Marko,
    check some of your local machine and fabrication shops, and ask them for drops around the size you are looking for, drops are smaller pieces leftover from other jobs. You might not get exactly what you are looking for, but sometimes you get lucky. Also ask for schedule 40(1/4" i think) well casing. Its basically 1/4" wall steel pipe and works perfect. Don't be too choosy on your bottom plate either, other than bigger is better and more stable. Check out drops for the base plate too. Tell the guys what you are doing and they should be happy to help. I have a couple of shops that I get stuff from now and then, and sometimes they toss some of the smaller pieces in for free. Remember they are leftover pieces and they are usually willing to let them go for cheaper, and if you get drops, just take them as is. It will cost you more if you ask for cuts. You may have to hit two or three of them to get what you want. I think you can get the tube and base plate for around $100 and maybe a lot less. My best haul was a 4 foot section of I-beam for $75 that weighed 300 lbs.

    Laminated metals specialist, Kitchen knife and gadget maker
    www.ealyknives.com
    www.mokume-jewelry.net
    "Build a man a fire and he will be warm for a day, set a man on fire and he will be warm for the rest of his life"

  8. #8
    Marko Tsourkan's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Westchester, NY
    Posts
    4,089
    Thanks. Will see what I can find.


    "If there’s something worth doing, it’s worth overdoing.” - An US saying.

    If my KKF Inbox is full (or not), please contact me via Email: anvlts@gmail.com

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Marko Tsourkan View Post
    Thanks. Will see what I can find.
    It could also be worth looking for an old scuba tank as they cut them in half when they fail a pressure test. They're either made of steel or Aluminium and would be about the right size.

  10. #10
    Senior Member

    SpikeC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    PDX
    Posts
    3,773
    I just realized that welding the bottom plate on is not really necessary. JB Weld™ will do the job! I have a chunk of old iron sewer pipe that I think I will make a tank out of.
    Spike C
    "The Buddha resides as comfortably in the circuits of a digital computer or the gears of a cycle transmission as he does at the top of a mountain."
    Pirsig

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts