Quantcast
Outdoor wok-ing - Page 2
+ Reply to Thread
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 11 to 20 of 35

Thread: Outdoor wok-ing

  1. #11


    Dave Martell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Airville, PA
    Posts
    9,491
    Quote Originally Posted by Zwiefel View Post
    Sorry, was referring to your lodge with the flat and round bottom.

    I wish I had some pictures, I'll shoot some next time I'm out there with the flame going.

    In case you'd like to check out the wok it's this one...
    https://secure.lodgemfg.com/storefro...idProduct=3983

    I realize that's it's not handy to handle but if you can see yourself woking without moving the vessel this one will fit the bill nicely. Funny but it's the only pre-seasoned Lodge that I've bought that actually looks great - it's pitch black inside and out. The skillets I bought at the same time, well, they're not so pretty and they've been seasoned like 5 times each. My opinion is that the pre-seasoning they do is crap.

  2. #12

    Zwiefel's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2012
    Location
    Little Rock, AR
    Posts
    2,169
    "pre-seasoned?" Never heard of such a thing...seems....weird...
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  3. #13
    Senior Member Miles's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Deep in the heart of a Texas kitchen
    Posts
    517
    I don't think Lodge sells anything without preseasoning any longer. It all comes preseasoned. It is a bit strange, agreed. I much prefer to season my own cookware. I guess the oven self clean cycle is tailor made for those who prefer to season their own.

  4. #14
    Senior Member tgraypots's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    530
    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    I've got a Bayou Classic high pressure burner with a Lodge Cast Iron wok (flat bottom outside & round inside) that I use outdoors and this set up rocks.
    I have a Bayou Classic patio stove with two burners and the same wok. I have yet to try them together, but gave up up on the wok indoors, preferring a carbon steel flat bottom for that. With loads of common and firebrick stacked up around here, I've also thought of making a fire ring for a carbon steel round bottom I've enjoyed since 1976, and cooking over a wood flame. All that said, the set-up Dave linked to looks pretty awesome to me.
    Tom Gray, Seagrove, NC

  5. #15
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    89
    a lot of my family cooks in the backyard using an outdoor burner and set up, especially for stir frying and cooking fish. Their set up don't use the flat bottom propane burners because it causes the wok to wobble around and become too unsteady. True wok cooking uses burners with cradles or a ring that the wok can set in and use high pressure burners that make flames 10 inches high. My family, as well as my aunts and uncles, were all in the restaurant business, so I grew up in restaurant kitchens. Don't get me wrong, low pressure burners can get hot too, but if it's slightly windy outside you will lost much of the heat in the wind unless you have some sort of wind guard (which can get in the way with your cooking). The high pressure burners keep the heat directed to the bottom of the work--it's is my personal preference.

    Also, in regards to the type of wok to use, I agree with many others that cast iron work is great to cook on, but I think my preference would be to use carbon steel woks. For one thing, it's much lighter to handle and easier to maintain than wok (unless you use it daily). And carbon steel woks are cheaper too. FWIW, most Asian restaurants use carbon steel woks with handles because cast iron is too heavy to hold and toss the food as is the method when cooking with a wok. If you use it frequently, it gets a real nice patina and nothing sticks to it.

  6. #16
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    89
    that's a nice little setup, although a bit expensive.

  7. #17
    Senior Member K-Fed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Palm City, FL
    Posts
    765
    Seeing as I don't have a problem spending a little coin on a good wok burner ( I love stir frying and love a good wok hey ) has anyone had a chance to use the Rambo series of wok burners? This time of year I work 7 days a week between two jobs in the kitchen and it would be killer to have a good setup to blast out quick meals seeing as I have next to no free time. I also have a fascination with wok cooking and have toyed with the idea of taking a part time job in a Thai/Chinese kitchen just to learn some solid technique.

  8. #18


    Dave Martell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Airville, PA
    Posts
    9,491
    I just came across this company, they've got some nice looking stuff.

    http://www.auscrown.com/page/shop/br...y/e/wokburners

  9. #19
    Senior Member K-Fed's Avatar
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Palm City, FL
    Posts
    765
    That's exactly the ones I was talking about. A little pricey but if I can invest 250 bones in a knife without blinking, is investing in the means to cook what I prepare so far fetched? I think I'm really just waiting for one of you guys to tell me to go for it lol.

  10. #20


    Dave Martell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Airville, PA
    Posts
    9,491
    Go for it!

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts