Quantcast
Has anyone seen Jiro Dreams of Sushi?
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 20

Thread: Has anyone seen Jiro Dreams of Sushi?

  1. #1
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    89

    Has anyone seen Jiro Dreams of Sushi?

    Has anyone seen this documentary? I just saw this recently and I found it very interesting from a food level and from a cultural level. I just wanted to see what folks on this forum thought about it. The quest toward that level of excellence in your craft was certainly inspiring to me (and how I look my own job), but would I want to spend over $400 for a meal--I'm not sure--to me it goes back to the idea of diminishing returns. Sort of the same idea of how much nicer is a $200 bottle of wine versus a $50 bottle--I've had both and quite frankly I'm quite satisfied with the $50 and the $150 in my pocket.


    In that vein, can a $20 piece of tuna be that much better than a $3 piece of tuna. Obviously, it's more than just the fish...there's the rice and how's it cut and what part of the body it came from as well? Jiro's sushi was beautiful in its simplicity and purity compared to American-style sushi, which is now done up with all sort of other things that the actual flavor and texture of the fish has taken somewhat of a backseat.


    I'm curious about other people's thoughts about this.

  2. #2
    I agree on the thing about diminishing returns, until you get to the level that Jiro is on. Eating there is not about return on investment, or getting good sushi. I can make good sushi. Its about eating the BEST sushi, a once-in-a-lifetime experience of eating food that suggests to be 20 bites of food at the pinnacle of readiness for consumption, where even the timing of when they slaughter the animals is not thinking about storage or efficiency, but when and how it will be in your mouth.

    I would pay $400 to eat there. No doubt.

  3. #3

    knyfeknerd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Charlotte, NC AKA The Queen City! The lint-filled belly button of the south.
    Posts
    2,674
    There are at least 2 other threads here about it. I cannot reference them now because I'm at work, but yes it is an awesome movie.
    If "Its" and "Buts" was candy and nuts, we'd all have a Merry Christmas
    -Cleon "Slammin'" Salmon

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    89
    Quote Originally Posted by BurkeCutlery View Post
    I agree on the thing about diminishing returns, until you get to the level that Jiro is on. Eating there is not about return on investment, or getting good sushi. I can make good sushi. Its about eating the BEST sushi, a once-in-a-lifetime experience of eating food that suggests to be 20 bites of food at the pinnacle of readiness for consumption, where even the timing of when they slaughter the animals is not thinking about storage or efficiency, but when and how it will be in your mouth.

    I would pay $400 to eat there. No doubt.
    Yeah, Eamon you are right...it IS about eating the BEST sushi (if you are able to afford it). I actually heard of some feedback I got from a friend's friend who ate there and had mixed reviews. Obviously, you can't diss on the food, but mostly about feeling a bit awkward and uncomfortable in the small and stark restaurant and seriousness of the staff.

  5. #5
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Seattle, WA USA
    Posts
    242
    I have seen a trailer for this. Your post got me looking for it and I found that Netflix has this streaming. I'm going to watch it today. Thanks! I have wanted to watch it for a while now.

    We have a lot of good sushi shops here in Seattle. I have found the sweet spot in quality of the sushi to be in the $35-$50 range a person for one meal. That is typically the point where for me the quality of the sushi seems to peak being clearly better than places in the <-$25 range but with diminishing returns from higher priced sushi. Of course a lot of it depends on the restaurant. In general I find this to be the case here. There is a lot of competition for your sushi dollar here and I think that tends to drive up the quality of the product and down the price at the same time. Our location also gives us easier access to top quality ingredients too and that must help I would think.

  6. #6
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Austin, TX
    Posts
    89
    Cool, let me know what you think after you watch it. It's great and certainly a must watch if you are a sushi lover. I know Seattle has lots of great sushi and it makes me jealous.

    There are a few top quality places in Houston prepared by trained sushi chefs, although more often than not most of the sushi is prepared by Mexicans workers that barely speak any English, which unfortunately was our experience when we went for sushi after watching the movie. I hope no one takes this as a racially discriminatory remark, I'm just pointing out the fact that they are not professionally trained and it shows. Needless to say, it was totally anti-climatic and depressing. Unfortunately, most Americans can't tell good from bad sushi. And as most businesses go, if you can get away with a cheaper option, its more money in your pocket (or at least that's how the rationale goes).

  7. #7
    Senior Member Crothcipt's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jan 2012
    Location
    wyoming, closer to nowhere than somewhere.
    Posts
    3,502
    great conversation, here is the original thread.

    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...highlight=jiro
    Chewie's the man.

  8. #8

    ecchef's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    In the Village.
    Posts
    3,350
    Quote Originally Posted by ayeung74 View Post
    ...can a $20 piece of tuna be that much better than a $3 piece of tuna.
    Yes.

    However it can also be much worse, depending on how it was handled.
    Though I could not caution all I still might warn a few; Don't raise your hand to raise no flag atop no ship of fools. - Robert Hunter

  9. #9
    I have never had sushi and I still liked the movie! I tried fresh Bluefin Tuna right out of the ice box a few hours after we caught it, and it wasn't that great, but eventually I still want to try real sushi!

  10. #10
    Senior Member
    mr drinky's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    St. Paul, MN
    Posts
    3,111
    Quote Originally Posted by BurkeCutlery View Post
    I agree on the thing about diminishing returns, until you get to the level that Jiro is on. Eating there is not about return on investment, or getting good sushi. I can make good sushi. Its about eating the BEST sushi, a once-in-a-lifetime experience of eating food that suggests to be 20 bites of food at the pinnacle of readiness for consumption, where even the timing of when they slaughter the animals is not thinking about storage or efficiency, but when and how it will be in your mouth.

    I would pay $400 to eat there. No doubt.
    I like how in the movie they said that Japanese people are often nervous when eating there and sometimes choose the son's restaurant because it is less intimidating. I wondered during the movie how nervous I would get if I were ever to eat there.

    k.
    "There's only one thing I hate more than lying…skim milk, which is water that's lying about being milk." -- Ron Swanson

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •