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Down to three.... Maskage Mizu/Masakage Yuki/Fu-Rin-Ka-Zan? - Page 3
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Thread: Down to three.... Maskage Mizu/Masakage Yuki/Fu-Rin-Ka-Zan?

  1. #21
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    Since you like japan handle wt.Buff. horn instead of plastic,thin & lite,I agree you cannot do much better for the price,excellent fit & finish than the Sakai.Either one that Rick suggested both good tools one carbon the other stainless.

  2. #22
    Senior Member eaglerock's Avatar
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    i'm sorry if i said wrong information about shuns steel.
    But my personal experience with the classic wasn't very good. it didn't stay sharp for more than 2 days and it was pain to sharpen.

  3. #23
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eaglerock View Post
    i'm sorry if i said wrong information about shuns steel.
    But my personal experience with the classic wasn't very good. it didn't stay sharp for more than 2 days and it was pain to sharpen.
    it wasn't the knife.

  4. #24
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by eaglerock View Post
    i'm sorry if i said wrong information about shuns steel.
    But my personal experience with the classic wasn't very good. it didn't stay sharp for more than 2 days and it was pain to sharpen.
    I think they are a pain to sharpen, but they do get very sharp and hold the edge for some time...coming from someone who doesn't really like them...
    one man gathers what another man spills...

  5. #25
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    sounds like a wire edge

  6. #26
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinacats View Post
    I think they are a pain to sharpen, but they do get very sharp and hold the edge for some time...coming from someone who doesn't really like them...
    i find the secret with VG10 is allowing enough time on coarser stones. strangely, that's also the secret for all other steels, in my experience.

  7. #27

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    hmmm thought I knew the way to go but now am wondering between these three

    1) Masakage Yuki - http://www.knifewear.com/knife-family.asp?family=18 - Shirogami clad with stainless

    2) Sakai-Yusuke-White-Steel-Wa-Gyuto-Knife-240mm - http://www.ebay.ca/itm/Japanese-Saka...ht_2605wt_1067

    3) Sakai-Yusuke-White-Steel-Wa-Gyuto-Knife-210mm-Special-Thin - http://www.ebay.com/itm/Japanese-Sak...item35bdc5db8b

    Questions:
    a) I know the 240 is the recommended length on this forum but someone about that super thin blade is very appealing and I don't see a super thin 240. Can this knife be too thin?
    b) the finish on these knives look nice, worth it over the stainless clad yuki I listed?

  8. #28
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    I have the 240 Yusuke special thin 1.6 at the spine.The 210 is 1.3.These are very thin carbon Lazors.I would not reccommed these as first quality Gyuto for a Student.Even the regular Yusuke is thin at 2.2 at the spine.Don't get me wrong I personally love mono steel thin carbon lazors,they just glide thru food.I have noticed sticksion when cutting potato's.They are excellent cutters for most fruits & vegetables & meat without bone.Also wt. a damp towel on board great for cutting sushi rolls.For push cut or slicing pull cuts they work well.

    Because they are white steel,easy to sharpen,get extremely sharp edges.Also because they are carbon & so thin proper knife care is a must.There is no excuse for knife abuse!Never let the edge hit anything except food & the board.If you understand about getting a protective patina on a carbon gyuto,you can have a thin blade that works well,the Yusuke's are great knives for the price,I think they are just as good as the Masamoto's & Suisin wa-gyuto's that cost more.

  9. #29
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    Sorry just wanted to add that you seem to be serious about getting a quality blade & have not pulled the trigger yet.What ever you get you are looking at some very good knives all in the 200.00 range.That Masakagi san mai blade is nice as well,I like the finish on the sides of that gyuto & 61-63 hrt is perfect for kit. knife.

    Even with the AEB-L thin stainless Gyuto,what ever you choose you will not lose,you are in the company of some fine Japan blades.

  10. #30
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by keithsaltydog View Post
    Sorry just wanted to add that you seem to be serious about getting a quality blade & have not pulled the trigger yet.What ever you get you are looking at some very good knives all in the 200.00 range.That Masakagi san mai blade is nice as well,I like the finish on the sides of that gyuto & 61-63 hrt is perfect for kit. knife.

    Even with the AEB-L thin stainless Gyuto,what ever you choose you will not lose,you are in the company of some fine Japan blades.
    +1
    one man gathers what another man spills...

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