Quantcast
Convex?
+ Reply to Thread
Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 16

Thread: Convex?

  1. #1
    Senior Member Mike L.'s Avatar
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Location
    Way over the hill
    Posts
    75

    Convex?

    Convex grinds and convex edges are very popular on sporting and defensive knives. Anyone tried/use them on kitchen knives?
    Hope I am not suggesting heresy.

  2. #2
    Senior Member
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Boston
    Posts
    513
    I think a lot/most knives have some degree of convexing; a convex grind helps mitigate stiction problems. I'm not sure about convex edges.

  3. #3
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Pensacola, FL, USA
    Posts
    3,662
    Nope, no heresy.

    Convex edges were used by Bark River on their kitchen series. For most people, it's easier to maintain a 'v' edge on waterstones rather than mess with sandpaper and mousepads or the expense and requirements of a belt grinder.

    Note that the practice of adding a microbevel is essentially approximating a convex edge.

    Rick

  4. #4
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2011
    Location
    Norn Iron
    Posts
    1,385
    Its a pretty complex subject but you are true that it works well with kitchen knives and most good knifes will have a convex grind.

  5. #5
    WillC's Avatar
    Join Date
    Jul 2011
    Location
    herefordshire uk
    Posts
    1,522
    Convex faces yes. Final bevels on very thin edges are much more practical as flat surfaces, and I think they cut better with less resistance. I tried very thin edges with convex final edges on my first few knives and it makes them a pain to maintain. On a thicker blade I say it can work, a convex on a cleaver works well, it does offer more support to the edge. But on uber thin edges I don't think the increase in support is noticeable and cutting resistance is increased as well as sharpening time.

  6. #6
    Dave Martell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Fleetwood, PA
    Posts
    9,286
    Quote Originally Posted by WillC View Post
    Convex faces yes. Final bevels on very thin edges are much more practical as flat surfaces, and I think they cut better with less resistance. I tried very thin edges with convex final edges on my first few knives and it makes them a pain to maintain. On a thicker blade I say it can work, a convex on a cleaver works well, it does offer more support to the edge. But on uber thin edges I don't think the increase in support is noticeable and cutting resistance is increased as well as sharpening time.

    A BIG from me on this one.

  7. #7
    Dave Martell's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Fleetwood, PA
    Posts
    9,286
    Convex edges will happen even if we don't want them to and that's just from our natural wobble while sharpening. I say try for a flat bevel and you'll be better off than trying to convex and getting a thick edge in the process.

  8. #8
    Senior Member VoodooMajik's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Jasper, Alberta
    Posts
    396
    I thought blending the bevel into the blade face was a form of convex edge? Am I mistaken?
    It's not the Answer it's the Experience

  9. #9
    Senior Member

    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    San Diego, CA
    Posts
    4,221
    No. But the bigger the bevel, the more it contributes to the overall characterstics of the blade. A tiny bevel blended into a blade face isn't going to make as big a difference as a large one.

  10. #10

    knyfeknerd's Avatar
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Charlotte, NC AKA The Queen City! The lint-filled belly button of the south.
    Posts
    2,350
    Nice thread Pops!
    No matter how high the throne,
    there sits but an ass.

+ Reply to Thread

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts