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Thread: Saffron "harvest"

  1. #11
    Senior Member Deckhand's Avatar
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    Very nice post. Thanks for sharing.

  2. #12
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    Dusty, I haven't tasted the flowers themselves. Have you heard if they are edible?

    eaglerock, they're very easy to grow (at least in our climate.) 1) Buy a bag of bulbs. 2) Dig a little hole about 10-15 cm deep. 3) Put the bulbs in roots down & cover them up. 4) Go have a beer to reward yourself for doing yardwork. That's it. I don't feed or water them. They bloom in the fall and put up some leaves that will disappear later. They multiply over time, but you only get saffron 3 threads per flower. I think we ended up with about a tablespoon of dried threads this year.

    We ate some just the other day, but no pictures. Made some tomato cheese grits to go with some blackened salmon (simmer some tomatoes with saffron, thyme, salt & pepper, then throw in some grits and cook until grits are done. Top with grated cheese.) For those of you who aren't familiar with grits, they're somewhat similar to polenta.
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  3. #13
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    I haven't heard either way, but I'd give them a go. I use a few different flowers for garnishes at work, wild onion, clover, rosemary...

    The purple of the saffron is quite striking, especially contrasted with the yellow of the stamen.

  4. #14

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    Nice photography and nice produce ma'am, thanks for the thread.

  5. #15

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    Very cool. Sorry Lucretia, you said saffron is easy to grow in your climate. Where are you? You say, 'within an hour of EE.' But what/where is EE?

  6. #16

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    All non-poisonous plants are entirely non-poisonous, and vice versa.

  7. #17
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    EE is Epicurean Edge, a knife store located in Kirkland, WA, USA, and a den of iniquity worthy of its own mention in the Forum Glossary. A wonderful place to fondle knives--many of mine were purchased there. At an hour away, it's entirely too close to where I live...I can't seem to walk in the door without dropping $$$. I'm overdue for a visit, but there's a Bill Burke sujihiki in clad 52100 and cocobolo that makes me drool, and I'm afraid to walk in the door there until it's sold.
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  8. #18
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by BurkeCutlery View Post
    All non-poisonous plants are entirely non-poisonous, and vice versa.
    Not necessarily true. Rhubarb stems are ok, the leaves are toxic. You can have poisonous parts on otherwise edible plants: if your potatoes have turned green, you want to trim it away before cooking because the green parts contain the toxin solanine. Time of year can even affect the toxicity of plants--you can eat the young spring leaves of pokeweed if you cook them; they'll be toxic later in the year
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  9. #19
    The alleles created by mutation may be beneficial

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    Quote Originally Posted by Lucretia View Post
    Not necessarily true. Rhubarb stems are ok, the leaves are toxic. You can have poisonous parts on otherwise edible plants: if your potatoes have turned green, you want to trim it away before cooking because the green parts contain the toxin solanine. Time of year can even affect the toxicity of plants--you can eat the young spring leaves of pokeweed if you cook them; they'll be toxic later in the year
    That's what I thought, too.
    Really cool pics, Lucretia. Is there any difference between this and the stuff you get from Spain / Iran?

  10. #20
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bieniek View Post
    Nice photography and nice produce ma'am, thanks for the thread.
    "Thread"?!?!?! An intentional pun?
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

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