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Thread: Whetstone and Sharpening advice

  1. #1
    Senior Member ChiliPepper's Avatar
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    Whetstone and Sharpening advice

    Hi ya

    long time lurker, I wanted to say you guys rock: a great community!

    To the question, I now have the following two combi stones:
    • Tojiro-rebranded (dunno OEM) 240/1000
    • Sun Tiger (maybe same as King?) 1000/6000



    These have been my first stone purchase and I must say I can now get my knives decently sharp on them, at least for my practical needs (let's say arm air shaving kinda sharp). But they are ugly: blades all scratched up
    I've never played with levels of kasumi finish, mirror polishing and so on but it all sounds fun. I'd be happy to practice with these techniques at some stage.

    The first issue/question I have is that it seems to me that the 6000 takes ages to produce the faintest appearance of mud (I aint got a nagura, if that matters) and same, to a lesser degree, with the 1000.
    And this happens both if I let the stone soak for an hour or if I try splash-and-go.
    So usually I get my knife sharpened and deburred, ready to proceed before any good amount of mud is produced.
    So, is it all my fault or the stones are known for not being mud-prone?

    Second thing is that I'm kinda wondering if, for normal maintenance, I could rely on a single stone, which would be nice. This got into my mind after reading positive comments about the Naniwa Green brick Aoto (the synthetic one), as being sort of a one-stop-shop stone that supposedly "cuts like a 1000ish" and "finishes as 4000ish".

    I'd appreciate any thoughts and comments you may have! Thanks in advance!

  2. #2
    Just a few comments...the Naniwa is nice for finishing European knives, but I don't use it in my normal progression on J-blades. As to using one stone, often the only thing I use for sharpening is my Gesshin 5k splash and go...that may be changing as I seem to be getting more use lately of my felt strop loaded with 'diamond juice.' I'm sure you will get better info, but hope this helps.

    Cheers
    once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by ChiliPepper View Post
    Hi ya

    long time lurker, I wanted to say you guys rock: a great community!

    To the question, I now have the following two combi stones:
    • Tojiro-rebranded (dunno OEM) 240/1000
    • Sun Tiger (maybe same as King?) 1000/6000



    These have been my first stone purchase and I must say I can now get my knives decently sharp on them, at least for my practical needs (let's say arm air shaving kinda sharp). But they are ugly: blades all scratched up
    I've never played with levels of kasumi finish, mirror polishing and so on but it all sounds fun. I'd be happy to practice with these techniques at some stage.

    The first issue/question I have is that it seems to me that the 6000 takes ages to produce the faintest appearance of mud (I aint got a nagura, if that matters) and same, to a lesser degree, with the 1000.
    And this happens both if I let the stone soak for an hour or if I try splash-and-go.
    So usually I get my knife sharpened and deburred, ready to proceed before any good amount of mud is produced.
    So, is it all my fault or the stones are known for not being mud-prone?

    Second thing is that I'm kinda wondering if, for normal maintenance, I could rely on a single stone, which would be nice. This got into my mind after reading positive comments about the Naniwa Green brick Aoto (the synthetic one), as being sort of a one-stop-shop stone that supposedly "cuts like a 1000ish" and "finishes as 4000ish".

    I'd appreciate any thoughts and comments you may have! Thanks in advance!
    Theoretically you could get by with just one stone. I think a 1k followed by a trail strop on newspaper would be fine.

    However, I like to have two stones--medium and fine. I usually stop after 1k for my slicers and go up to 4k for everything else.

    You definitely do not need more than two stones if you are not doing any heavy metal removal. Even then, I gave up on coarse stones a long time ago. I've never had to use them and if I really need to re-profile or repair a knife I will take it to the belt grinder.

    A medium/fine combi stone will do everything you want.

    I understand this might be different for single bevels, and I admit I know nothing when it comes to sharpening them.

    But for western style knives, it's hard to argue with Murray Carter.

  4. #4
    Senior Member ChiliPepper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Canadian View Post
    Theoretically you could get by with just one stone. I think a 1k followed by a trail strop on newspaper would be fine.

    However, I like to have two stones--medium and fine. I usually stop after 1k for my slicers and go up to 4k for everything else.

    You definitely do not need more than two stones if you are not doing any heavy metal removal. Even then, I gave up on coarse stones a long time ago. I've never had to use them and if I really need to re-profile or repair a knife I will take it to the belt grinder.

    A medium/fine combi stone will do everything you want.

    I understand this might be different for single bevels, and I admit I know nothing when it comes to sharpening them.

    But for western style knives, it's hard to argue with Murray Carter.
    True indeed but again the guy can sharpen blades just by looking at them...

  5. #5
    Senior Member ChiliPepper's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinacats View Post
    Just a few comments...the Naniwa is nice for finishing European knives, but I don't use it in my normal progression on J-blades. As to using one stone, often the only thing I use for sharpening is my Gesshin 5k splash and go...that may be changing as I seem to be getting more use lately of my felt strop loaded with 'diamond juice.' I'm sure you will get better info, but hope this helps.

    Cheers
    Interesting: why would it be good especially for european knives? Does that stone only work well with low hardness alloys?

  6. #6
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    If you want to experiment with finishes, you should get a Suehiro Rika 5k or a med-soft J-nat. I like the Awasedo I got from Jon, particularly. Naniwa (both superstones and choseras) work well for pretty much all knives although superstones are a bit touchy and slower than average. The best all around synthetics I've tried are the Gesshin soaker series (400-2k-4k).

  7. #7
    Quote Originally Posted by ChiliPepper View Post
    Interesting: why would it be good especially for european knives? Does that stone only work well with low hardness alloys?
    Not so sure why, but sure doesn't work too well on my harder steel knives...stone is waaaay over rated at some retailer sites...mushy/chalky comes to mind.
    Cheers!

    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...Naniwa+Aotoshi
    once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinacats View Post
    Not so sure why, but sure doesn't work too well on my harder steel knives...stone is waaaay over rated at some retailer sites...mushy/chalky comes to mind.
    Cheers!

    http://www.kitchenknifeforums.com/sh...Naniwa+Aotoshi
    I don't know the "Atoshi" but the Superstones and Choseras are pretty good stones and work well on all but the most wear resistant steels.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    I don't know the "Atoshi" but the Superstones and Choseras are pretty good stones and work well on all but the most wear resistant steels.
    The aotoshi is also known as the green brick and sold at that site that we don't talk about. It is nowhere near the Chosera or Superstones in quality.
    once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinacats View Post
    The aotoshi is also known as the green brick and sold at that site that we don't talk about. It is nowhere near the Chosera or Superstones in quality.
    Ah! The green brick, I do know. Thanks.

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