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You asked, you whined, now here it is: Kato passaround - Page 18
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Thread: You asked, you whined, now here it is: Kato passaround

  1. #171
    Hehe where are the reviews?

  2. #172
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    This is the beastliest gyuto I've ever used. I have a 240 Zakuri gyuto that weighs the same but it has a much heavier ebony handle. I've also used a Mizuno honyaki that was beastly but at 230+ mm, it didn't really handle like this one which is a very blade heavy 270. To cut to the chase, I really liked it. It does a lot of work for you. It isn't very reactive (at least not by the time I got it). Edge taking is a piece of cake and edge holding was above average compared to other carbon steels. It touches up with minimal effort (strop w/ diamond or 5+k stone) but that's to be expected of most knives. I don't know how many times it's been sharpened but it remained quite thin behind the edge although the choil shot is misleading due to a slight overgrind at the heel. I agree with daveb in that it is very Shig-like in performance although most Shigs I've used have tended to wedge more than this one and are noticeably lighter. I also give Shigs the nod with regard to food release. Regardless, I think I'd pick this knife over a typical Shig although I still prefer a couple of other knives in my stable.

  3. #173
    Senior Member markenki's Avatar
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    Thanks for your thoughts.

    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    Regardless, I think I'd pick this knife over a typical Shig although I still prefer a couple of other knives in my stable.
    I'm curious to hear what those knives are.

  4. #174
    Quote Originally Posted by markenki View Post
    Thanks for your thoughts. I'm curious to hear what those knives are.
    Me too!

  5. #175
    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    Regardless, I think I'd pick this knife over a typical Shig although I still prefer a couple of other knives in my stable.
    Quote Originally Posted by markenki View Post
    I'm curious to hear what those knives are.
    Quote Originally Posted by Patatas Bravas View Post
    Me too!
    It is a pretty sizable stable. I am going to say some of TK's top cutters include but are not limited to: Devin's, Gengetsu, & Carter SFGZ.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  6. #176
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    Quote Originally Posted by JohnnyChance View Post
    It is a pretty sizable stable. I am going to say some of TK's top cutters include but are not limited to: Devin's, Gengetsu, & Carter SFGZ.
    Pretty much... Of the "stock" gyutos, I like my Gengetsu the best. I also continue to reach for (and buy) Devin and Tilman's knives. Then there are the one's I've modified myself. Those include Glestain, A-type, and Heiji. I like my Carters a lot but the edge retention just isn't there. I happen to be baby-sitting an Ashi honyaki that's pretty awesome, too. Okay... I'm rambling. I'm going with Gengetsu for a stock knife.

  7. #177
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    Pretty much... Of the "stock" gyutos, I like my Gengetsu the best. I also continue to reach for (and buy) Devin and Tilman's knives. Then there are the one's I've modified myself. Those include Glestain, A-type, and Heiji. I like my Carters a lot but the edge retention just isn't there. I happen to be baby-sitting an Ashi honyaki that's pretty awesome, too. Okay... I'm rambling. I'm going with Gengetsu for a stock knife.
    Semi-stainless or white #2 core?

  8. #178
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    Semi stainless. Tk wrote a great review of it. And it's pretty much been sold out ever since.

  9. #179
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    I've spent quality time with both versions. The white version gets that exciting carbon steel edge more so than the semi (obviously) but the edge retention on the semi is much better in my kitchen. I loved both of them. OOTB, they are such sweet cutters. I wanted to get it in a steel that would allow me to keep that original geometry as long as possible before I'd have to modify/thin it.

  10. #180
    Senior Member markenki's Avatar
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    The Kato is on its way back to its owner. Here are my quick thoughts on the knife, which I'll be comparing with a Shigefusa 240 kasumi gyuto.

    The first thing I noticed about the Kato was that the heel had a small chip at the very corner. The only other Kato I've seen in front of me (a brand new one) had a similar chip. Not sure what to make of that observation.

    The finish was not bad, but not up to Shigefusa quality. The spine was smooth and polished. The choil was not as polished, and had more-visible tooling/scratch marks, but was perfectly fine and comfortable; no sharp edges. I wouldn't take any points away from the Kato for that; just a different way of doing things, I guess.

    The knife came with an octagonal burnt chestnut handle. Never having seen one up close, I was not a fan of burnt chestnut, but I've now changed my mind. That handle was very nice!

    The Kato is thick and heavy, and my initial thought was "there's no way this knife will cut well". I could see it wedging already. Well, I was wrong. This knife is cutter, folks.

    I started out with big white mushrooms, and on those the Shigefusa did marginally better, requiring slightly less effort to go through. Next up was onions. On those the Kato was better. While the Shigefusa required some pushing to go through some parts, the Kato seemed to just fall through. Maybe the weight of the Kato had something to do with it, but I don't believe that is the whole story. There must be something about its geometry that just works. Amazing.

    Potatoes were the final test, and here, too, the Kato won. While neither knife just fell through, the Kato required noticeably less effort.

    For feel in my hand, I prefer the Shigefusa, probably because it is lighter, but dammit, that Kato can cut!

    In summary, the Kato is a very, very, nice knife that performs extremely well.

    Many thanks again to Ben for allowing us to try the knife out. I think I need one.

    Best regards,

    Mark

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