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Thread: Pre-patina?

  1. #21
    Senior Member Jmadams13's Avatar
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    Do you have any images of the patina that might be offered? I agree that it's part of the fun of a new knife to watch it develop and sometimes fun to play with forced, but if it looks nice then that would definitely be an option to consider
    "This is grain, which any fool can eat, but for which the Lord intended a more divine means of consumption.. Beer!" -Robin Hood, Prince of Thieves, Friar Tuck

  2. #22
    as someone who's completely clueless when it comes to carbon steel (aside from what I've learned in using straight razors, in which only some of my vintage blades have developed any patina at all over many many years - I just keep em dry and/or oiled to prevent rust) this option is attractive to me, tho I would imagine as I learn more I would also appreciate developing my own patinas over time. With my limited experience/knowledge I would be afraid to screw up a patina on my first carbon blade....

  3. #23
    Senior Member cclin's Avatar
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    hi Dave, could you give me more detail about the pre-patina-d (etched) will look like?? is it look like you did on etched hiromoto AS??
    Charles ***[All statements I made here only my personal opinion and nothing more!]*** & Please bare with me for my crappy English!!

  4. #24
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Anything to hide? I know people who sandblast blades to hide grinding issues...

  5. #25
    I think it is a great idea.If you want to sell to NORMAL people it would be a nice marketing tool......If you read this you are not Normal

  6. #26
    Weird Wood Pusher Burl Source's Avatar
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    My preference is for the knife to arrive clean, without a patina.
    While some of the patterns with a forced patina might look cool, my thought is that it would limit instead of increase sales.
    I enjoy watching the patina develop on it's own.
    Maybe if you include a print out of how to force a patina as well as how to care for the knife.
    Mark Farley / It's a Burl
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  7. #27
    Quote Originally Posted by cclin View Post
    hi Dave, could you give me more detail about the pre-patina-d (etched) will look like?? is it look like you did on etched hiromoto AS??

    Hiro AS's are clad in stainless so the outer layer stays lighter and the core gets black. I make mono-steel blades so all I'd have is one even tone or gray/black. I did some playing around with the steel I use (O1) and found that if I mirror polish the blades and quick etch I can then buff to a gray shiny look that is a lot better looking (IMO) than a flat appearance.

    You can see the difference between dark flat spots and light shiny spots on the knife below. This knife shows the two extremes of etching very well.




  8. #28
    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    Anything to hide? I know people who sandblast blades to hide grinding issues...

    Etching can make fine grind lines disappear but isn't able to hide "issues". So it's like a chemical helper for making a finer more even appearing finish. The thing here is that this only works to an extent of the knife being evenly ground to begin with as uneven finishes will still show unless a really deep dark etch is used.

    So to summarize there's no hiding grind issues behind etching, at least not from what I've seen anyway.

  9. #29
    And just to be clear, that knife shown above (the pattern of the etch) isn't what I'm considering doing here, that's just being shown to give some reference to the levels of finish you can achieve by etching - one being dark and flat and the other being light and shiny.

  10. #30
    that's pretty neat Dave. again I've got a lot of research to do regarding patinas and carbon steel. but I can see that being otentially useful as a marketing tool - especially if you are able to get very detailed with it

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