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Thread: Moving out from parents, need new knives

  1. #21
    Senior Member heirkb's Avatar
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    It's up to you at the end of the day, but even within one series, different knife styles have different types of handles. Look at the bread knife Kanji and handle vs. the gyuto. Slightly different. Or their handles. So if you just get western handled knives, they'll look as much like a set as getting three Fujiwaras or three Tojiros. Anyways, up to you at the end of the day. The Tojiros seem well liked and the honesuki from that line is also well liked, so you could pick that up too if you do a lot of heavy/tough work (cutting through bones, etc.)

  2. #22
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    Alot of good info. on knives here & stones.Wooden boards are best for home use.I Use a 14x20"for veg. & fruits.A smaller 17x13" for protiens.Both boards are thin& lite not end grain.Got the larger Bamboo at Ross over 5 yrs. ago paid under 20.00.Still going strong after daily use has not warped.The smaller one is very lite wood fr. Japan got it at Japanese department store here,been using it over 3 yrs.

    I like to wash my boards after use,a lite board is much easier to handle than a heavy end grain board.I put my boards out in the sun to dry.

    Alot of knifenuts are aware of the fine edges on their blades & like endgrain as the best cutting board.They are more expensive & heavy a tradeoff.

  3. #23
    Dave Martell's Avatar
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    I would buy Tojiro or any Japanese made knife anyday - all day over any Lamson made Artifex knife. There's more to making a knife correctly than stamping them out to look the part. I'm stating this based on how many re-works of these knives I've been doing in their short history vs how many reworks I've done on new Japanese knives in all the years I've been working on them. The American companies/makers have a LOT to learn still. I say spend your money wisely on proven performance.




    Edit - No moritaka though

  4. #24
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    I would buy Tojiro or any Japanese made knife anyday - all day over any Lamson made Artifex knife. There's more to making a knife correctly than stamping them out to look the part. I'm stating this based on how many re-works of these knives I've been doing in their short history vs how many reworks I've done on new Japanese knives in all the years I've been working on them. The American companies/makers have a LOT to learn still. I say spend your money wisely on proven performance.
    What do you have seen, Dave?

  5. #25
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    I'm curious about artifex problems as well. Anything major?

  6. #26
    Dave Martell's Avatar
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    It's not a specific Artifex problem, it's a problem for all of the knives made by that maker. They've all got whacky profiles (made by machine and not tweaked by hand), they're thicker than need be, and fit and finish is no better than the cheapest Japanese variants.

    And before someone accuses me of hating on a certain retailer here (well OK - I do hate them) but this isn't about that since they too sell (the comparable) low end Tojiro (and other Japanese) brands as well.

  7. #27
    Dave Martell's Avatar
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    Oh and while I'm typing - do NOT go for their "finish sharpening" unless you're looking for a project to "finish" yourself. Pick anyone here and send it to them over accepting what their on staffers can do. I'm talking bad - REAL bad.

  8. #28

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    Ok, thank you all for the help.
    I think I'm gonna stick with Tojiro DP series and give it a try.
    I searched this forum, and what I see constantly reccomended to newbies as far as sharpening is Bester 1200, Suehiro Rika 5000 and DMT XXC.
    So I think I'm gonna order the sharpening combo above, unless someone would have different thought.

  9. #29
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    Toyopl,All good choices,esp. the sharpening setup.With it all you need is some freehand skills.I recomm.Dave Martell's(The Art Of Knife Sharpening Basics)DVD.

  10. #30
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    I have no allegiances here but I will confirm that the 'finish sharpening' was not worth it. I bought a couple as gifts for family given the price and the steel. I had them finish sharpened to save myself some time--money wasted--My Edge Pro with Choseras puts an infinitely better edge than the one they arrived with. I do like the steel once it's properly sharpened (I know, jigs are for woosies) as it's stayed sharp with minimal maintainence for quite a while.

    Just my $.02


    Quote Originally Posted by Dave Martell View Post
    Oh and while I'm typing - do NOT go for their "finish sharpening" unless you're looking for a project to "finish" yourself. Pick anyone here and send it to them over accepting what their on staffers can do. I'm talking bad - REAL bad.

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