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Is sharpening a necessary skill to keep a decent working edge? - Page 2
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Thread: Is sharpening a necessary skill to keep a decent working edge?

  1. #11
    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    Realistically, you could easily maintain a kitchen knife with a 5 or 6k stone and not have to worry too much. A guy like you would be able to sharpen as well as any of us in now time.
    I agree. For myself, it wouldn't be so much of a problem because I enjoy learning how to sharpen, but for someone like my aunt, she would never consider purchasing a stone and actually learning how to use it, even though she likes sharp knives.

    Is it possible in that case to keep a decent edge?

  2. #12
    You can strop it or touch it up on a fine stone for a while, but eventually, it's going to need at least a good thinning. I have a gyuto I have been using at home since Mid August this year and I've only had to strop it a few times. A fine stone works well for a touch up. The other option is to have a couple of knives. Use one and strop/touch up on a fine stone until it needs sharpening/thinning. Send it out, use the other one until that one gets to the point where it needs attention and keep rotating them.

  3. #13
    Quote Originally Posted by Don Nguyen View Post
    Most people I know don't sharpen their knives. Let's say I buy a decent knife with a working edge, and take good care of it (soft cutting board, washing separately, keeping dry, storing safely, no abuse).

    If I don't use a sharpening stone, how should I best keep that edge? Regular honing on a rod, and send it for sharpening every couple months?
    Your scenario will work only if perfect technique is used every time and the edge does not chip or deteriorate past the point where a rod will be able to maintain it.. IMO there are too many factors that can cause the edge to deteriorate.
    A person should be able to use a stone or two to bring back an edge.

  4. #14
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    Well... There is always Chefs' Choice-type products... BTW, honing rods are fine for high hardness as they are the ceramic variety. The only thing is they are just cylindrical stones and aren't any easier to use than a flat stone, IMO. Just make sure they don't take their knives to the fellows with the high speed dry-grinding wheels at the supermarket, etc.

  5. #15
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    sachem allison's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Nguyen View Post
    I agree. For myself, it wouldn't be so much of a problem because I enjoy learning how to sharpen, but for someone like my aunt, she would never consider purchasing a stone and actually learning how to use it, even though she likes sharp knives.

    Is it possible in that case to keep a decent edge?
    Don, if she is Vietnamese she'll just use the back of a rice bowl.lol
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

  6. #16

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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Nguyen View Post

    Do you do any sort of touch ups?
    An occasional touch on a ceramic rod. That's it. I used to use an F. DICK multi-cut steel. O can't. Seem to see a real difference.

    -AJ

  7. #17
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by mainaman View Post
    Your scenario will work only if perfect technique is used every time and the edge does not chip or deteriorate past the point where a rod will be able to maintain it.. IMO there are too many factors that can cause the edge to deteriorate.
    A person should be able to use a stone or two to bring back an edge.
    Thats exactly how I see it as well. You may imagine it's possible to maintain an edge during weeks of home use, just by stropping on newspaper. It does require some technique, knowledge and experience, though, you only can expect with a reasonably good sharpener.

  8. #18
    Senior Member Cadillac J's Avatar
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    Be a sharpening resource for your aunt

    I sharpen for all my friends and family. After I take their knives and put on the initial edge, I will bring my old worn down 5K SS with base as a travel stone to do touch ups when I stop over there. When they need a brand new edge, they bring over and I turn it around for them while they visit usually.

    However, I've been thinking about them buying a cheap King stone, and then showing them how to strop on it. For a novice, it might even be easier to hold both hands on the knife and see the angle that it might be to swipe a rod (not sure).

  9. #19
    @ Son

    I had considered the ceramic rods as well, but at that price, they might as well get a King 1000? Seems like proper stropping/sharpening is unavoidable. Maybe my goal should now be convert all friends and family to be sharpening addicts.

  10. #20
    Senior Member eto's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Don Nguyen View Post
    Most people I know don't sharpen their knives. Let's say I buy a decent knife with a working edge, and take good care of it (soft cutting board, washing separately, keeping dry, storing safely, no abuse).

    If I don't use a sharpening stone, how should I best keep that edge? Regular honing on a rod, and send it for sharpening every couple months?
    The amount of time Spent just reading this thread could of been spent sharpening your aunts knife on a stone

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