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Thread: exactly how much care is required for carbon steel?

  1. #11
    Senior Member smilesenpai's Avatar
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    Is any method of patina better than another for resistance purpose?

    Carbon is week against acidic items, right? Will a patina protect its edge or will I there be a chance I will have to touch it up on a 6k stone?

  2. #12
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    The agent used to force a patina will eat your edge. Soak a 1095 in hot vinegar and a well polished edge will change in one sharpened on P60 sandpaper.

  3. #13
    Carbon steel takes more care for two reasons:

    It is much more reactive than stainless, and will discolor and corrode in contact with many food items. As noted, once it has a good patina this is less of a problem, but leaving any carbon steel knife wet with salty food on it will result in rust and pitting in a few hours. Wash and dry after each use, which is a good habit anyway.

    Also, while carbon steel is much easier to sharpen, it will not hold an edge nearly as long. Stainless steel is much more abrasion resistant, and often less likely to have the edge roll over (not always true, depends on the alloy and hardness). However, a carbon steel knife can have the edge restored easily many times with a steel, while a hard stainless knife doesn't respond so nicely.

    I like carbon steel, as it's much easier to get a very sharp edge. However, I'm a home cook and it's not a big deal to sharpen a knife any time I wish. Edge retention is much more important to someone who is going to need a nice, sharp knife for hours on end in a professional setting. No time outs for sharpening in the middle of the evening rush.

    Peter

  4. #14
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    There's no way to protect your edge against acid. With regard to sharpening all the time, there is one consideration that few here talk about: If you like the way your knife cuts OOTB, the only way to enjoy that a long time is to use something that you don't have to sharpen often. The more you sharpen, the sooner your knife will suck. Even if you're great at thinning, your knife will never really cut the way it did OOTB.

  5. #15
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    no offence tk but most knives ive used have horrid edges ootb and usally need a good thin and sharpen to bring up to a knife nut style standard. but maybe its just the knives i own

  6. #16
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jai View Post
    no offence tk but most knives ive used have horrid edges ootb and usally need a good thin and sharpen to bring up to a knife nut style standard. but maybe its just the knives i own
    you're using the wrong knives.

  7. #17

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    There's no way to protect your edge against acid.
    Wouldn't different steels respond to acids differently?
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  8. #18
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    Depends on the type of carbon knife. For san mai knives, the cladding is often far more reactive than the core steel.

    "monosteel" carbon knives don't require any special treatment once a patina is established in my experience.

  9. #19
    Senior Member smilesenpai's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Benuser View Post
    Soak a 1095 in hot vinegar and a well polished edge will change in one sharpened on P60 sandpaper.
    Sorry I am new to knives. Could you explain what "1095" is?

  10. #20
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    a type of carbon steel mostly found in american style kitchen knives. like old hickory.

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