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Thread: exactly how much care is required for carbon steel?

  1. #21
    Senior Member smilesenpai's Avatar
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    EdipisReks Is your avatar a nerdy fridge?

    So the carbon knives dull faster but get a nicer edge easier... Is this why they are so common used in Japan?
    I really want a carbon knife - want to try patina and what not - but sooner or later I will be using it in a profession kitchen. So I am trying to figure out what will be best.
    I must be a knife nut, as sharp (not Kono HD sharp) isnt enough for me.
    Last edited by smilesenpai; 06-15-2013 at 08:19 AM. Reason: typo

  2. #22
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    Not necessarily. My Aogami Super (blue super) steels maintain their edge with the best of them. It's a carbon steel. But it is more difficult to sharpen.

    If it is difficult to sharpen, it tends to hold its edge longer. You're looking for the magic sweet spot in a steel that is tough, won't chip, can be sharpened to steep angles, and is easy to sharpen. Getting the combination is all about compromises.

  3. #23
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by bkdc View Post
    Not necessarily. My Aogami Super (blue super) steels maintain their edge with the best of them. It's a carbon steel. But it is more difficult to sharpen.

    If it is difficult to sharpen, it tends to hold its edge longer. You're looking for the magic sweet spot in a steel that is tough, won't chip, can be sharpened to steep angles, and is easy to sharpen. Getting the combination is all about compromises.
    I don't find AS sharpening particularly difficult. Some have suggested starting with a relatively coarse stone do deal with the tungsten carbides.

  4. #24
    Senior Member ThEoRy's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smilesenpai View Post
    So the carbon knives dull faster but get a nicer edge easier..
    Nope. With any steel, carbon or stainless, it all depends on the forging and heat treatment.
    Starting this harvest I'm a starving startling artist/
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  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by jai View Post
    no offence tk but most knives ive used have horrid edges ootb and usally need a good thin and sharpen to bring up to a knife nut style standard. but maybe its just the knives i own
    That's why I indicated "If you like the way your knife cuts..." If you're knife sucks to begin with, then YES. Grind a new knife out of it.

  6. #26
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    Quote Originally Posted by Zwiefel View Post
    Wouldn't different steels respond to acids differently?
    Of course. All the steels we talk about here will corrode in acid. Only the rate changes depending mainly on Chromium remaining in solution. What I'm saying is there is not much you can do, short of greasing your blade down to the edge that will affect this rate. Even then, I would imagine the grease will come off pretty quickly after which you'll get the normal rate of corrosion. Patina is irrelevant and so is cladding because a fresh edge shouldn't have a patina nor cladding. Patina is corrosion, in and of itself so depending on how fine your edge is, once the edge patinas, you've lost some keenness to your edge. How much would depend on the strength, concentration and time of exposure.

  7. #27
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by smilesenpai View Post
    EdipisReks Is your avatar a nerdy fridge?
    it absolutely is.

  8. #28

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    Quote Originally Posted by tk59 View Post
    Only the rate changes depending mainly on Chromium remaining in solution.
    This is exactly what i was looking for, thanks!
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  9. #29
    "1095" is a steel alloy, specifically iron with 0.95% carbon. It is one of the most common carbon steel knife materials in the West. Hardens well (although typically more on the surface than in depth, great for knives and springs), sharpens easily, holds it's edge well, and responds nicely to a knife steel. it is also inexpensive.

    For example, all old (pre 1980's) Chicago Cutlery knives in carbon steel are 1095 steel. I've seen them sharpened down to slivers from meat packing plants, where they were VERY common.

    Typically hardened to around 54 Rockwell, so they are easy to sharpen and easy to roll an edge back up with a steel.

    Japanese carbon steels tend to be more complicated alloys with refractory metals added (manganese, vanadium, etc) and are typically hardened to 62 Rockwell and up. Very hard, somewhat brittle, and more difficult to sharpen --don't try to use an Arkansas stone, the blade will simply skate around on it -- but take a razor edge when polished.

    Peter

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