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Why the Petty and what size?
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Thread: Why the Petty and what size?

  1. #1

    Why the Petty and what size?

    Sorry for the newb question but I don't fully get the petty. I get the petty for meat when one does not want a giant knife. Seems like 150 mm is the popular size for veg but wouldn't a 165 nakiri or even santoku be better choice?

    Please school me on the subject. Thx

  2. #2

    Zwiefel's Avatar
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    I like the 180MM petty myself...it's still very manuverable, and it's easy to pack in a bag.

    I think the 150mm is better for in-hand work, which I don't do much of.
    Remember: You're a unique individual...just like everybody else.

  3. #3
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    Pettys are nice for butchering if you don't want a single bevel specialist knife, and useful if you want really fine cuts of something delicate--garlic, strawberries, etc. There's not much I use a petty for that you couldn't also do with a gyuto, but the petty's nimbleness lets you have more control in tight quarters--like when dismembering a chicken or duck.

  4. #4
    It's a matter of preference. Petty - (petite gyuto) has familiar geometry and feels natural in my hand for small work. I rehandled mine with a longer handle for more comfort/balance. I don't use mine for boning work. I have a honesuke for that - it has a stout blade I don't have to worry about chipping.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by heldentenor View Post
    Pettys are nice for butchering if you don't want a single bevel specialist knife, and useful if you want really fine cuts of something delicate--garlic, strawberries, etc. There's not much I use a petty for that you couldn't also do with a gyuto, but the petty's nimbleness lets you have more control in tight quarters--like when dismembering a chicken or duck.
    I definitely agree with you. I also just take out my 150 mm petty for smaller jobs that I'm too lazy to take out my gyuto for.

  6. #6
    Great info so far. Very useful. Thanks all!

  7. #7
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    I think my friends use my petty more than I do, but it is great for small work. Trimming meat, stemming strawberries, general small work it is great for.

  8. #8
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    Sometimes, I just need to dice a couple of tomatoes or an avocado or peel a single fruit, etc. Unless I have a large knife sitting there, I'll pick up a 150-210 petty instead.

  9. #9
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    There is almost nothing you can't do with a gyuto. However, if your gyuto or chef's knife happens to be a carbon, it could make sense to have a smaller stainless blade for fruit. That may be a petty, a Western boning knife, or whatever you have and is thin and sharp.

  10. #10

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    I love mine for fruit and vegetable work, especially tomatoes. As said, great for detail work. Also, it's my knife of choice for trimming meat especially removing silver skin. I find it more maneuverable in my hand.

    -AJ

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