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Thread: Deboning oxtail

  1. #1

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    Deboning oxtail

    Can I get a knife recommendation for deboning oxtail? I make it regularly - typically using the meat for ragu/ragout and the bones for a white beef broth for Korean soups.

    Is there a magic knife out there that makes this task less of a pain, or is it a pain regardless of the knife?

  2. #2
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Have you ever tried a traditional désosseur, thin, with a little flex

    http://www.tompress.com/I-Grande-165...-13-cm.net.jpg

    I must admit I never deboned a raw oxtail, and after cooking you hardly need a knife.

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    I only had the chance to try a really cheap, crappy one a while back. I found the blade too flimsy for oxtails and the handle way too small and slippery. That said, I'm currently doing said deboning with an equally sketchy paring knife. A real thrill seeker I am.

    I've pretty much decided that my next purchase should be a decent 6" petty. Has anyone done oxtails with a petty/utility? What's the verdict?

  4. #4
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    sachem allison's Avatar
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    Frankly in 20 years of cooking and 38 years of eating oxtail, I have never seen or heard of anyone deboning it. I'm curious, why are you deboning it? Is it for a special recipe or preparation? Not trying to be an ass, would really like to learn something new. Do you have pic of this procedure, That would be rather interesting. I imagine it is a huge pain with all the joints and knobs and bony projections on the vertebrae.
    I haven't lived the life I wanted, just the lives I needed too at the time.

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    Senior Member NO ChoP!'s Avatar
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    We make oxtail chili, and braise the tails, then pull the meat off by hand. It's tedious cooked, can't imagine doing it raw.
    The difference between try and triumph is a little "umph"! NO EXCUSES!!!!!!!
    chefchristophermiller@yahoo.com

  6. #6

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    Quote Originally Posted by sachem allison View Post
    Frankly in 20 years of cooking and 38 years of eating oxtail, I have never seen or heard of anyone deboning it. I'm curious, why are you deboning it? Is it for a special recipe or preparation? Not trying to be an ass, would really like to learn something new. Do you have pic of this procedure, That would be rather interesting. I imagine it is a huge pain with all the joints and knobs and bony projections on the vertebrae.
    I'm just a home cook, so I never realized it was so uncommon. I only started doing it a couple years ago for two reasons: (1) more browned surface area on the meat for oxtail ragu, and (2) the bones can be used to make a white beef stock for a lot of different Korean soups. In relation to the latter, I once suggested to my wife that we rinse off the leftover bones from cooked oxtail and use them for the Korean stock. She would have none of it, as that's not how the traditional Korean stock is made. So let's convince her I need a new knife instead.

  7. #7
    Senior Member Benuser's Avatar
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    Now it's obvious to me, you NEED a honesuki.

    Misono Swedish Carbon with JCK:

    http://japanesechefsknife.com/images/Img600.jpg

  8. #8
    Senior Member heirkb's Avatar
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    I thought the honesuki was more poultry and the hankotsu was more mammal, but not sure why.

  9. #9
    Das HandleMeister apicius9's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by heirkb View Post
    I thought the honesuki was more poultry and the hankotsu was more mammal, but not sure why.
    That's why you need both

    Stefan

  10. #10

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    Hankotsu! Now there's an interesting idea. Never used one, but it rather seems like a petty on roids.

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