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Thread: Goat Charcuterie

  1. #1
    Senior Member Carl's Avatar
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    Goat Charcuterie

    I have this funky little dream about having a small hobby-sized goat ranch/dairy, not that the goats are hobby-sized but the operation is. But at the same time I'd like for it to pay for itself and maybe even make a few bucks (not looking to be a goat ranching magnate), and so looking at ways to upvalue the production. At the very least I can enjoy it myself, but I'm certain there are some restaurants, ethnic or otherwise, who might be interested in the products.

    Instead of selling raw milk it's worth the small investment to sell yogurt or aged cheese. Instead of selling live goats for slaughter it's worth the small investment to sell fresh primals and cured meats. So I've been looking for recipes and instructions on how to do that, and I've found some, but I thought I'd ask here as well, since we have such a variety of intelligent folks here, from all over the world or have traveled it.

    Are goat sausages, cured or fresh, really that different from lamb and mutton versions? I found a recipe for mocetta, a northern Italian cured goat ham, prosciutto-ish, and wondered if some here had recipes for other charcuterie as well. I'm really interested to try my hand, as well as enjoy a new way to eat this worldwide popular though scorned at home meat.
    BBQ Heretic

  2. #2
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Carl View Post
    I have this funky little dream about having a small hobby-sized goat ranch/dairy, not that the goats are hobby-sized but the operation is. But at the same time I'd like for it to pay for itself and maybe even make a few bucks (not looking to be a goat ranching magnate), and so looking at ways to upvalue the production. At the very least I can enjoy it myself, but I'm certain there are some restaurants, ethnic or otherwise, who might be interested in the products.

    Instead of selling raw milk it's worth the small investment to sell yogurt or aged cheese. Instead of selling live goats for slaughter it's worth the small investment to sell fresh primals and cured meats. So I've been looking for recipes and instructions on how to do that, and I've found some, but I thought I'd ask here as well, since we have such a variety of intelligent folks here, from all over the world or have traveled it.

    Are goat sausages, cured or fresh, really that different from lamb and mutton versions? I found a recipe for mocetta, a northern Italian cured goat ham, prosciutto-ish, and wondered if some here had recipes for other charcuterie as well. I'm really interested to try my hand, as well as enjoy a new way to eat this worldwide popular though scorned at home meat.
    I have a lamb 'prosciutto' hanging in my drying room as I type this. And I've a bunch of pates, as well as multiple lamb sausages. We had an entree on the menu for awhile that consisted of: harrisa brined and cherry wood smoked rack of lamb, beluga lentils, lamb mortadella with pistachio and smoked Castelvetrano olives, and a lemon mint consommé. Sold pretty well.
    Goat is just a little gamier, and fuller flavored. The only reason I use lamb primarily in a restaurant setting, is that goat(or mutton) still has a bit of a bad reputation in the U.S. in my experience. Makes it a hard sell. I dunno how much charcuterie experience you have, but I'd be happy to share some techniques/recipes if you're interested.
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  3. #3
    Senior Member Carl's Avatar
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    Thanks, I am interested. My charcuterie is limited to making bacon from pork belly according to the direction on the back of the bag. Oh, and eating all kinds. But I want to do more, take baby steps, and really learn what I'm doing well.

    What you've described is exactly where I want to go.

    We hunt, me and my in-laws, and so we have ample portions of deer and elk in the freezer all the time. The gamy flavors you speak of are not foreign to us, which is another reason goat is so desirbale for me.

    Thanks
    BBQ Heretic

  4. #4
    I like goat meat - it's totally different from lamb. It's hard to get hanging meat around here unless you go to a farm and buy a whole carcass. Frozen chunks are available in the local store, but I want to prepare a whole muscle group. Goat makes incredible Carnitas.

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