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Thread: Composite damascus cleaver - WIP

  1. #11
    GoogleFu San steeley's Avatar
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    Man great job on the pictures Will and a shot of breakfast very nice.
    A clever cook can make good meat of a whetstone.” Erasmus

  2. #12
    Awesome WIP it's always amazing to see the work that goes into some of the exotic Damascus patterns. Only question though why the plain O1 for the edge and won't that shorten the overall lifespan of the knife? I've never had to deal with it but there's been a few posts here of old knives that have been worn down to a half of their original height through decades of sharpening I can't imagine ever sharpening that often but with this knife at a certain point wouldn't you run out of the O1 edge and have the Damascus patten be your cutting edge?

  3. #13
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    Very cool WIP! Those twisted thingies looks so nice

  4. #14
    WillC's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by The hekler View Post
    Awesome WIP it's always amazing to see the work that goes into some of the exotic Damascus patterns. Only question though why the plain O1 for the edge and won't that shorten the overall lifespan of the knife? I've never had to deal with it but there's been a few posts here of old knives that have been worn down to a half of their original height through decades of sharpening I can't imagine ever sharpening that often but with this knife at a certain point wouldn't you run out of the O1 edge and have the Damascus patten be your cutting edge?
    Excellent question and one i've given allot of thought. Firstly it is a big old chunk of 01 on the edge there, it extends right up the bevel a good 20mm of it there, and 01 at this HT is tough as old boots! If you ever wore that entirely away, the steel mix behind it is very serviceable, just a slightly different nature, the nickel layers are super thin, but soft so it would be a toothy edge, 01/15n20 make a tough blend. In a more open pattern like this there are hardness differences between the steels, but still you have something 59-60hrc on the edge, except the uber thin nickel slices.
    I think you would have to use this day in day out sharpening and thinning daily for many years to get that far.

    The choice of 01 on the edge in this case....I want a uniform, uber fine grain steel on the edge most suited to push cuts. On a Suji or even a big Gyuto the relative toothy edge of damascus is perfect for a slicer.

    These are tiny details, it could be damascus on the edge and it would work fine on push cuts, its just little tweaks trying to make something as good as it can be for the specific style of knife, or to the best of my ability/knowledge at this current time.

    Lastly with the composites, this is a very old way of making a blade of differential hardnesses. The absolute hardest, toughest steel is on the edge, a hard but tougher mix in the centre, and a softer mix on the spine. Its not something thats really needed unless you got into a Suji sword fight with a rival on the line......but its just nice to work though some of the old knowledge in a kitchen knife. Its mainly for the look and the uniqueness, though its nice that the construction brings more to the table than just looks.

    Another bonus is that this knife can be thinned as you sharpen, (as the final bevels are flat) without effecting the pattern. I'm planning on etching the whole thing, then a stone finish to the bevels, which is for the most part 01 anyway, It may or may not have a micro bevel, but it will be kept tiny in keeping with this style of knife. So that allows future users to play with their stone collections, getting that nice hazy finish on the bevel without touching the etch.

    So assuming someone does buy a knife like this to use day in day out as an utter kitchen beater sharpening daily and unnecessarily on a course brick - it is designed to be up to the task within reason and I have given some thought to hard use.


    Thanks Guys for the comments.

  5. #15
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    Really interesting to see how it is done,it looks like an immense amount of work.It is cool that you are reviving an old pattern.Thanks for sharing

  6. #16
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    However I was very surprised not to see any black pudding in the fry up?

  7. #17
    WillC's Avatar
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    I do love good black pudding, but only the really good stuff, I've even eaten it cold as a bar snack, jolly good. No good in damascus billets though, it just makes everything all sticky
    thanks all

  8. #18
    Senior Member RoanRoks29's Avatar
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    Awesome Post!! I love seeing the metal work behind the blades, and I love seeing how much thought goes into each step you took! Amazing !! Thanks for sharing !! I cant wait to see the finished Piece!!

  9. #19
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    Stornoway black pudding is easily my fav! Knife looks great, i love the various experimentations that go on!

  10. #20
    Senior Member quantumcloud509's Avatar
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    Loving the cleaver.

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