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Thread: European knives ?

  1. #11
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Oh yeah, some guy named Devin Thomas, or something
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

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  2. #12
    Senior Member DeepCSweede's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    Oh yeah, some guy named Devin Thomas, or something
    I think I have heard of him - isn't he called Hoss too?

  3. #13
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    I should have said "Japanese STYLE knives"--by which I mean light and nimble, as opposed to the heavier Henckels/Wuesthoff type knife. Some of my "Japanses" knives were made in the United States.
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  4. #14
    Don't forget some of the commercial US makers - Lamson, Ontario, Forgecraft, etc. The carbon knives are great I love using the 10" Lamson I converted and I have a 12" Ontario I just took the slabs off of.

    And then there is that Carter guy . . .

  5. #15
    Senior Member stevenStefano's Avatar
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    I've tried a few European knives and using them in work, the edge retention just sucks. Japanese knives also tend to be way better value for money. Saying that, my 2 most used knives did come from Germany though the only thing they have in common with the knives you are talking about is that they came from Germany

  6. #16
    Quote Originally Posted by Lucretia View Post
    I should have said "Japanese STYLE knives"--by which I mean light and nimble, as opposed to the heavier Henckels/Wuesthoff type knife. Some of my "Japanses" knives were made in the United States.

    Not to be nit-picky , but writing "Japanese style" when referring to knives of western type is kind of a misnomer. Moreover, if you look at industrially produced western chef's knives pre-1950s--unless they are specialty knife--they all fit these descriptive terms.

    Again, (and this is not directed towards you, Lucretia) I think it is unfair to categorize all European knives as poor. I have a stainless Sekiryu Santoku that is soft and brittle, sucks to sharpen and holds an edge for 5 min. That doesn't mean I equate an entire nation with crappy knives--

  7. #17
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    I'm Queen of Nit Picking, so please tell me when I speak incorrectly and I'll try to do better! I would agree that assessing knife quality based strictly on where it's manufactured is a mistake.

    It's interesting how things change. Back around 1994 I was at a Q&A session that had a panel of chefs & others who were big names in the food world. (I don't remember who all was on the panel other than Julia Child and Jacques Pepin.) Someone asked what kind of knife they should get--and the answer was almost unanimously "Wuesthoff!" For the home cook, "high end" knives were the Wuesthoffs and Henckels you'd see in department stores or in specialty kitchen shops. I bought my "good" knives before the Internet was regularly used for shopping and research purchases. When I decided to try one of those funny looking santokus that you'd see used on TV, it was a revelation (and it was also a Wuesthoff.) Who knew lightweight, thin knives could be so much more enjoyable to use? It was the first step on a slippery (and expensive!) slope. I've replaced all my knives (and then some) and it's been worth every penny.
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    Oh yeah, some guy named Devin Thomas, or something
    Thanks Tom, that brought a tear to my eye.

    Hoss

  9. #19
    Just a couple thoughts...

    First, I think it'd be great to learn more about non-Japanese makers, including the Canadian, British and US makers I see here. However - and I don't think too many here are the same as me in this regard, but - personally, I'm kind of interested in the culture behind the knives and stones in Japan and this motivates my interest in them.

    Quote Originally Posted by Canadian View Post
    Europeans perfected the geometry of western style knives long before the Japanese started producing gyutos, pettys and sujihikis.
    Absolutely, and no one ever hides how these designs originated from the west. However, I wonder if the old idea that 'someone invents something and then the Japanese make it better' might come into play. It can happen.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    It's a matter of taste, personal style ... Japanese knives are (generally) thinner, harder, sharper, more effortless to cut with and have a great amount of character and tradition to them...even new styles like gyutos and pettys. In general, the performance is even better than almost every other knife out, but extra care and attention are needed.
    Agreed. I love the character and tradition. Think of a place like Sakai, where for several centuries they've been making swords and more recently kitchen knives, and they still continue today supported by a local culture that demands it. I don't know of another blade-place in the world quite like it. Unique and cool.

    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    For me, what makes "our makers" so great is out ability to have ongoing, progressive discussions with them ... pure sharpness and fun performance - insert Murray Carter.
    I haven't even been near his knives. Regardless, I think it's fair to say he should be classified as a Japanese maker, no?

  10. #20
    Canada's Sharpest Lefty Lefty's Avatar
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    Carter is Canadian born, Japanese trained and American living. For me, I meant accessible for the average North American knife nut, when I wrote "our makers". But, yes, "Japanese" knives are definitely what he makes.

    Hoss, c'mon...you're obviously one of the "pinnacle" makers.
    09/06

    Take a look around at: www.sharpandshinyshop.com

    Email me at: tmclean@sharpandshinyshop.com

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