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Thread: European knives ?

  1. #21
    Senior Member Lucretia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    Hoss, c'mon...you're obviously one of the "pinnacle" makers.
    No doubt about that!
    Now is not the time to bother me. And it's always now. Wiley Miller

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by Lefty View Post
    Carter is Canadian born, Japanese trained and American living. For me, I meant accessible for the average North American knife nut, when I wrote "our makers". But, yes, "Japanese" knives are definitely what he makes.
    I knew what you meant.

    What was it - something like 19 years in Japan, and so about half his life? Just pointing it out for the wider world in case.

  3. #23
    Quote Originally Posted by Lucretia View Post
    I'm Queen of Nit Picking, so please tell me when I speak incorrectly and I'll try to do better! I would agree that assessing knife quality based strictly on where it's manufactured is a mistake.

    It's interesting how things change. Back around 1994 I was at a Q&A session that had a panel of chefs & others who were big names in the food world. (I don't remember who all was on the panel other than Julia Child and Jacques Pepin.) Someone asked what kind of knife they should get--and the answer was almost unanimously "Wuesthoff!" For the home cook, "high end" knives were the Wuesthoffs and Henckels you'd see in department stores or in specialty kitchen shops. I bought my "good" knives before the Internet was regularly used for shopping and research purchases. When I decided to try one of those funny looking santokus that you'd see used on TV, it was a revelation (and it was also a Wuesthoff.) Who knew lightweight, thin knives could be so much more enjoyable to use? It was the first step on a slippery (and expensive!) slope. I've replaced all my knives (and then some) and it's been worth every penny.
    My first "good" knife was also a Wusthof (Ikon--the one without the full bolster). It wasn't a bad knife, but once I bought a Hiromoto AS I quickly realized that the Wusthof, though it had better fit and finish, was inferior in sharpness and geometry.

    The difference was amazing, but over the years, many knives later and much money spent my tastes started to become more refined and once I handled a pristine 1890s hand forged French Sabatier (rat tang) I began to see the problem with a lot of Japanese western style knives--all of a sudden my Hiro felt clunky...

    Aspects many Japanese gyuto makers neglect for me are distal taper*, balance**, and toughness***.

    *the only Japanese maker I have come across that has mastered this aspect is Shigefusa. This also relates to balance...

    **though scoffed at on forums and overemphasized my commerical practices, I've found balance in hand being an important aspect of any knife. This became extremeley apparent when I handled two knives and the heavier [custom] blade felt lighter and handled nicer than the blade heavy lighter knife. When I weighed them on a scale I was in disbelief.

    ***This is where choice of steel and optimal heat treat come in.

  4. #24
    daveb's Avatar
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    Lets not forget that Martell guy. I think he hosts a web forum as well as making the occasional knife.
    Dave
    Older and wider.

  5. #25
    Ehh, one is a minivan, the other is a race car. One is low maintenance and great for everyday use by just about anyone. The other requires extra care, maintenance and attention by a skilled user, but in the end they are rewarded with much greater performance.
    "God sends meat and the devil sends cooks." - Thomas Deloney

  6. #26
    Senior Member Salty dog's Avatar
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    My favorite knives to use are by Japanese makers. Just saying. It's really not even close. IMO.

  7. #27
    Senior Member eto's Avatar
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    Wow this is a great thread . Really enjoying everyone's different views on Japanese - knives , European etc..

    This thread really touched on many things that influence knife makers , cooks , chefs, collectors etc. when it comes to kitchen cutlery.

    I think the future is looking bright on both sides.

  8. #28
    Senior Member EdipisReks's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Salty dog View Post
    My favorite knives to use are by Japanese makers. Just saying. It's really not even close. IMO.
    i haven't been crazy about the Western artisan knives i've tried, though i'm more than willing to be shown the light.

  9. #29
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    Carter is Canadian born, Japanese trained and American living. For me, I meant accessible for the average North American knife nut, when I wrote "our makers". But, yes, "Japanese" knives are definitely what he makes.
    so that's why i keep hearing a canadian accent on his videos. clears that up for me.

  10. #30
    Senior Member labor of love's Avatar
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    i know this may be a little off topic but does anyone else wish one of the sabatier brands made chef knife with a hitachi steel(or something similar) hardened to rockwell 61 or so?

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