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Thread: Black garlic

  1. #31
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spinblue View Post
    But isn't this exactly how (duck) confit is achieved? The fat is poured over the legs and the air tight seal prevents bacteria from occurring.
    The confit is typically cooked for many hours at a low heat (225-275 degrees) in fat, and cooled in said fat. So the heat destroys most of the harmful pathogens, and leaving it sealed in the fat doesn't allow the duck to come into contact with airborne pathogens after cooking. It also slows rot causing bacteria, and enzymes in the meat that kick start the breakdown of the tissues(cooking also denatures those enzymes as well). Hence the preservation aspect(curing the duck before cooking will lengthen said preservation even further).
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  2. #32
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ajhuff View Post
    Oh. I was under the impression that it was manufactured not naturally occurring.

    -AJ
    I'd equate it more to raising livestock, than manufacturing. Except with bacteria, instead of animals
    The AI does not love you, nor does it hate you, but you are made out of atoms it might find useful for something else. - Eliezer Yudkowsky

  3. #33
    Senior Member spinblue's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brainsausage View Post
    The confit is typically cooked for many hours at a low heat (225-275 degrees) in fat, and cooled in said fat. So the heat destroys most of the harmful pathogens, and leaving it sealed in the fat doesn't allow the duck to come into contact with airborne pathogens after cooking. It also slows rot causing bacteria, and enzymes in the meat that kick start the breakdown of the tissues(cooking also denatures those enzymes as well). Hence the preservation aspect(curing the duck before cooking will lengthen said preservation even further).
    Thanks, I understood the confit process, but this certainly helps the insight on how the black garlic comes about. Thank you.

  4. #34
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brainsausage View Post
    It's deceptively simple to make, but also a big pain in the a$$. You have to keep whole heads of garlic at about 130-40 degrees Fahrenheit, for about 30-40 days. I just vaccum sealed them and threw them in the restaurants dehydrator, which is always on and at that temp anyways. But it'd be a real ***** to try and pull that off otherwise...
    I am going to try this in my dehydrator, would a zip-lock bag work or should I try to wrap this some other way?
    once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right

  5. #35
    Senior Member marc4pt0's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by spinblue View Post
    Thanks, I understood the confit process, but this certainly helps the insight on how the black garlic comes about. Thank you.
    Also, pouring fat over duck (thus completely submerging it), doesn't mean said duck is now in an air free our oxygen free environment. The duck itself, especially the bones, have air/oxygen in them. It's the cooking/confit process that helps eliminate the air. Of course when making duck confit the fat should never bubble, but the stray occasional bubble breaking the surface it's actually the air leaking out.
    Hours later, when your confit is finished and cooled in it's own fat, then it's air free.

  6. #36

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    Quote Originally Posted by brainsausage View Post
    It's very akin to roasted garlic, but sweeter, and earthier, almost curry-like. It also has a touch of that ferment tang, but none of the raw garlic sting. And the texture is really fun, very fudge-esque.
    First time I had it (this week!) I didn't even know what it was...

    Stuff we have is very sweet, almost kuro-sato like, and the slight garlic kick only comes in after it's down the gullet. Not smelly afterwards either, but you know it was garlic. Co-pilot stuck it in tonight's pasta which worked, but a waste I think. Better off as a kind of side pickle (tsuke-mono) for my taste.

    Very unique and unusual stuff.

    Stu.

  7. #37
    Senior Member brainsausage's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinacats View Post
    I am going to try this in my dehydrator, would a zip-lock bag work or should I try to wrap this some other way?
    That should work fine. You're basically just trying to keep the garlic from drying out, whilst it ferments. I dunno if you have any farmer's market style action where you are, but the better quality the garlic, the better your end result will be.
    The AI does not love you, nor does it hate you, but you are made out of atoms it might find useful for something else. - Eliezer Yudkowsky

  8. #38
    Senior Member chinacats's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by brainsausage View Post
    That should work fine. You're basically just trying to keep the garlic from drying out, whilst it ferments. I dunno if you have any farmer's market style action where you are, but the better quality the garlic, the better your end result will be.
    Thanks, I am going for it with the best quality I could find locally...here that happens to be Whole Foods.
    once in a while you get shown the light, in the strangest of places if you look at it right

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